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Updated: 20 min 38 sec ago

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

2 hours 58 min ago

"Human beings are the only species that deliberately deprive themselves of sleep for no apparent gain," says sleep scientist Matthew Walker. His new book is Why We Sleep.

(Image credit: MCKIBILLO/Getty Images/Imagezoo)

After Hurricane Power Outages, Looking To Alaska's Microgrids For A Better Way

3 hours 58 min ago

Alaska is a leader in microgrids since its remote communities have had to power themselves for decades.

(Image credit: Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk)

Studies Skewed By Focus On Well-Off, Educated Brains

4 hours 6 min ago

What does a "normal" brain look like? Something a lot different when researchers make sure that study participants reflect the race, education and income levels of the U.S. at large.

(Image credit: Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars

8 hours 1 min ago

In an astonishing discovery, astronomers used gravitational waves to locate two neutron stars smashing together. The collision created 200 Earth masses of pure gold, along with other elements.

(Image credit: Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science)

Mindfulness Apps Aim To Help People Disconnect From Stress

13 hours 7 min ago

Finding inner calm hard to come by? Some people use their device obsession to help them disconnect. The apps aren't a quick fix, therapists say, but might help you stick to a mindfulness practice.

(Image credit: Photo Illustration by Carolyn Rogers/NPR)

'Quackery' Chronicles How Our Love Of Miracle Cures Leads Us Astray

Sun, 10/15/2017 - 7:02am

Tobacco enemas? Mercury pills? Ice pick lobotomies? A new book explains how throughout history, miracle "cures" often didn't just fail to improve people's health, they maimed and killed.

(Image credit: Courtesy of Workman Publishing)

A School For Kids With Autism Copes With Fire's Physical And Emotional Damage

Sat, 10/14/2017 - 6:00am

Dealing with a fire or other natural disaster is hard on anyone, from evacuation to aftermath. And people with physical or developmental disabilities have particular needs, say emergency planners.

(Image credit: Adam Grossberg/KQED)

Jeremy, The Lonely, Left-Twisting Snail, Dies — But Knows Love Before The End

Fri, 10/13/2017 - 6:46pm

OK, "love" might be overstating it. But the little lefty — whose seemingly hopeless search for a mate sparked an international quest — did manage to procreate before he slithered off this mortal coil.

(Image credit: Angus Davison/University of Nottingham)

'The Butchering Art': How A 19th Century Physician Made Surgery Safer

Fri, 10/13/2017 - 4:28pm

Before surgeons accepted germ theory, operations often killed patients. All Things Considered host Robert Siegel talks with the author of a new biography of antiseptic advocate Joseph Lister.

(Image credit: Bettmann Archive)

With OK From EPA, Use Of Controversial Weedkiller Is Expected To Double

Fri, 10/13/2017 - 4:14pm

The EPA says farmers can still spray dicamba on their crops next year — with some new restrictions. The weedkiller has been blamed for drifting into fields, damaging millions of acres of crops.

(Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

Is Harrison Ford An Android In 'Blade Runner'?

Fri, 10/13/2017 - 1:32pm

Ever since the first movie achieved cult status, fans have hotly debated if Rick Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, is a replicant. Blade Runner 2047 leaves room for argument, says fan Adam Frank.

(Image credit: Joel Ryan/Invision/AP)

California Blazes Are Part Of A Larger And Hotter Picture, Fire Researchers Say

Fri, 10/13/2017 - 12:10pm

The wildfires in California's wine country are coming in the midst of a near-record fire season nationwide. Researchers say a warming climate is a factor.

(Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Elizabeth Loftus: How Can Our Memories Be Manipulated?

Fri, 10/13/2017 - 8:21am

Years of research have taught Elizabeth Loftus just how unreliable our memories are. From tweaking a real memory to planting a completely fabricated one, tampering with our minds is surprisingly easy.

(Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/TED)

This Week's Air Quality Is Worst On Record For San Francisco Bay Area

Thu, 10/12/2017 - 4:32pm

As wildfires spread through Northern California counties, clouds of smoke and ash are spreading, too, far beyond the flames. Air quality officials have a database that's searchable by zip code.

(Image credit: Lesley McClurg/KQED)

Is This How The Trump Administration Might Save Coal?

Thu, 10/12/2017 - 4:22pm

Energy Secretary Rick Perry says subsidizing coal and nuclear power plants would make the grid more reliable. An unlikely array of critics say the move is expensive and unnecessary.

(Image credit: Reid Frazier/Allegheny Front)

The Mechanics Behind Yellowstone's Old Faithful

Thu, 10/12/2017 - 4:08pm

The Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park blows water approximately ever 90 minutes. The the mechanics behind this beautiful mystery have been revealed this week in a new study.

FDA Panel Endorses Gene Therapy For A Form Of Childhood Blindness

Thu, 10/12/2017 - 2:43pm

After many setbacks for genetic therapies, advisers to the Food and Drug Administration recommended approval of the first gene treatment for an inherited form of blindness.

(Image credit: Spark Therapeutics)

Brazil's Deep Cuts To Science Funding Will Lock Country In The Past

Thu, 10/12/2017 - 2:17pm

Scientists worldwide have watched Brazil's budget cuts in shock. We, too, could see trouble ahead if flat U.S. federal spending without additional corporate funding continues, says Marcelo Gleiser.

(Image credit: monsitj/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

After A Failed Launch, Smart Shoe Benefits From A Reboot

Thu, 10/12/2017 - 8:59am

Hahna Alexander initially invented a shoe that could charge a battery, but no one wanted to use it. "You have to invent something that people can't live without," she says.

(Image credit: Frederic Siegel for NPR)

The Coming Sewer Gold Rush

Thu, 10/12/2017 - 4:26am

Environmental chemists studied Swiss sewage and found trace amounts of gold, silver and rare earth metals. It could be valuable, but chemists say it's probably not worth the cost of recovering.

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