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Updated: 44 min 13 sec ago

How Climate Change Is Already Affecting Health, Spreading Disease

Tue, 10/31/2017 - 4:01am

For decades, scientists have predicted how climate change will hurt people's health. Now an international team of researchers say they're already seeing some of the damage.

(Image credit: (From left) Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images; Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images; Arif Hudaverdi Yaman/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

How Climate Change Is Already Affecting Health, Spreading Disease

Tue, 10/31/2017 - 4:01am

For decades, scientists have predicted how climate change will hurt people's health. Now an international team of researchers say they're already seeing some of the damage.

(Image credit: (From left) Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images; Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images; Arif Hudaverdi Yaman/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Scientists From Around The World Report On Health Effects From Climate Change

Tue, 10/31/2017 - 4:01am

A big, international team of scientists has come together to assess how climate change has affected people's health around the world in the past few decades. A rise in heat waves and weather-related disasters threatens the health of millions each year.

Study: CEOs Who Invest In Social Responsibility Initiatives Risk Their Jobs

Tue, 10/31/2017 - 4:01am

A new study shows that CEOs who invest in corporate social responsibility initiatives put themselves at significant risk of losing their jobs.

Brain Patterns May Predict People At Risk Of Suicide

Mon, 10/30/2017 - 6:27pm

A computer program learned to identify people thinking about suicide by studying brain activity patterns associated with words like "death" and "trouble."

(Image credit: Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

Shop Around: Subsidies May Offset Your 2018 Health Insurance Price Hike

Mon, 10/30/2017 - 3:08pm

Premiums for top-line HealthCare.gov policies are going up, federal officials confirm. But higher subsidies could cut some consumers' out-of-pocket expenses enough to make coverage cheaper overall.

(Image credit: Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

Toxic. Sour. Atomic. Why We Love To Hate Gross Candy

Mon, 10/30/2017 - 2:35pm

Candy is supposed to be sweet and delicious. So why are we tempted by candy that pretends to be made of hazardous chemicals, that threatens to nuke our tastebuds, or that dares us to be disgusted?

(Image credit: Photo illustration by /Josh Loock / NPR )

How Tariffs Could Help And Hurt The Solar Industry

Mon, 10/30/2017 - 4:00am

The U.S. solar industry is bracing for possible tariffs or quotas on imported solar panels. Such action could have very different consequences on different parts of the industry.

(Image credit: Grace Hood/CPR)

Alexa, Are You Safe For My Kids?

Mon, 10/30/2017 - 3:51am

Talking to a device that talks back can be entertaining and educational for children. But psychologists say children can develop relationships with these devices that can be different than adults.

(Image credit: Michelle Kondrich for NPR)

Did The EPA Censor Its Scientists?

Sun, 10/29/2017 - 8:08am

Last week, EPA scientists were pulled from speaking at a meeting where they would address climate change. New EPA leaders were quickly accused of censoring their own scientists, says Adam Frank.

(Image credit: stevegeer/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Bats And Tequila: A Once Boo-tiful Relationship Cursed By Growing Demands

Sun, 10/29/2017 - 7:07am

As the tequila industry surges, the early harvesting and cloning of agave are disrupting the ecosystem of some species — leading some groups to go to bat for the hardworking nighttime pollinators.

(Image credit: Merlin Tuttle/Bat Conservation International)

'Hidden No More': Encouraging Girls To Pursue STEM

Sat, 10/28/2017 - 7:09am

NPR's Melissa Block talks to Yefon Mbangsi, a chemical engineer in Cameroon, about coming to the U.S. to participate in a State Department program inspired by the film Hidden Figures.

Who Says You Can't Train A Cat? A Book Of Tips For Feline-Human Harmony

Fri, 10/27/2017 - 12:53pm

Feline behavior specialist Sarah Ellis explains how you can train your kitty to come on command, take medicine and stop waking you up in the middle of the night. Originally broadcast Sept. 12, 2016.

Megan Phelps-Roper: If You're Raised To Hate, Can You Reverse It?

Fri, 10/27/2017 - 7:36am

Megan Phelps-Roper grew up in the Westboro Baptist Church, which preaches a message of hate and fear. But after engaging with her critics--on Twitter, no less--she decided to leave the church.

(Image credit: Jasmina Tomic/TED)

South Florida Worries About Possible Dike Failure

Fri, 10/27/2017 - 4:05am

All is not well with Lake Okeechobee in south Florida. All the water is being held back by a troubled earthen dike that surrounds the lake. After strong storms, there's concern it could collapse.

We're Not As Good At Remembering Faces As We Think We Are

Fri, 10/27/2017 - 4:05am

Being able to recognize faces is a crucial part of life. Some of us are very good or bad at it, but in general we aren't as good as we think we are.

Does Smoking Pot Lead To More Sex?

Fri, 10/27/2017 - 3:00am

Surveys of 50,000 people found that those who smoked marijuana had sex more often than those who abstained from the drug. What's unclear is whether other factors explain the apparent link.

(Image credit: Katarina Sundelin/PhotoAlto/Getty Images)

Scientists Spot First Alien Space Rock In Our Solar System

Thu, 10/26/2017 - 4:22pm

Astronomers are eager to learn more about the visitor as it zooms through, like how far-off planets form: "You'd love to see if it looks like stuff in our solar system."

(Image credit: Brooks Bays / SOEST Publication Services / UH Institute for Astronomy)

AI Model Fundamentally Cracks CAPTCHAs, Scientists Say

Thu, 10/26/2017 - 3:03pm

The report says the model has defeated tests used to tell humans from bots. It uses reasoning to explain the jumbled letters.

(Image credit: Vicarious AI)

Skull Is Potentially From The Oldest Known Victim Of A Tsunami

Thu, 10/26/2017 - 8:37am

Researchers say they've determined that a skull discovered in 1929 likely belonged to an individual who was killed in a tsunami 6,000 years ago.

(Image credit: Channel 7 TV Sydney via AP)

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