News from WLRH and NPR

News from NPR

As the military response to the Islamic State heats up, an ideological front is opening against the group. They're using social media to explain why ISIS' interpretation of the Koran is wrong.

A new study of drinking water in areas where fracking is used to extract natural gas found that contamination is not common and it probably did not come from deep underground.

In his new article, The New Yorker's Malcolm Gladwell uses a well-known theory to contrast early school shooters back in the 1990s with shooters today.

Barbara Byrd-Bennett is expected to appear in court on Tuesday. She is accused of taking $2.3 million in kickbacks for steering no-bid contracts to a former employer.

In 2012 the U.S. Supreme Court limited life sentences without parole for juveniles who commit murder. On Tuesday the panel will hear arguments on whether the ruling should apply retroactively.

Ahead of Tuesday's first Democratic presidential debate, we revisit the facts of the Benghazi investigation and how it became potentially damaging to the political fortunes of Hillary Clinton.

If the deal is formally agreed upon, the company would own around 31 percent of beer sales around the world.

In 2012, the court barred mandatory life sentences for juveniles convicted of murder. Now justices will consider whether that ruling should apply retroactively to more than 2,000 convicted offenders.

Farmers clear land by lighting fires, causing smoke to blanket huge areas of southeast Asia. A prolonged drought may be making the fires worse. Renee Montagne talks to BBC reporter Rebecca Henschke.

In Hindu-dominated India, the cow is sacred and as Hindu Nationalists gain ground there is a new zeal to aggressively — and sometimes fatally — enforce bans on beef.

Data from shows that in the first half of 2015, roughly 60 percent of borrowers who used a mortgage to buy a home in Des Moines were between the ages of 25 and 34.

Hillary Clinton needs to appear likable and trustworthy, while Bernie Sanders needs to appear presidential. Others need to make the case for why voters should give them a look.

The indictment stems from a July incident in which a group of white men in Confederate flag-adorned pickup trucks verbally clashed with black partygoers. Some of the confrontation was caught on video.

Nearly 100 people died in bombings targeting a peace rally this weekend in the capital of Ankara. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has laid the blame for the attack with the Islamic State.



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