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A widely watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.

Librarians are being reassigned to classrooms. In Illinois, librarians must also have teaching certifications, and most have endorsements to teach specific grades and subjects.

Amazon has thousands of workers in Germany and many are unhappy that they're classified as lower-paid logistics workers. The company says they're well compensated for unskilled labor.

When we talk, we focus on the "content" words — the ones that convey information. But the tiny words that tie our sentences together have a lot to say about power and relationships.

And, author Kwei Quartey adds, "The police may not find you for a little while." That's why he chose to set his second Detective Inspector Dawson book in Ghana's capital.

The wealthy Ricketts family includes conservatives and a liberal, activists and a candidate. Between them, they raise and spend a lot of political money — and exemplify how the system has changed.

Gabrielle Nuki hopes to be a doctor someday. So when the 16-year-old found out that she could work as a fake patient helping to train medical students, she jumped at the chance.

The U.S. military's attention to PTSD is well-documented but Kurdish fighters living with the same disorder haven't received nearly as much care. Arun Rath talks to journalist Jenna Krajeski.

One of the lawyers for self-proclaimed Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed resigned from the Army last week. He tells NPR the government is putting on a "show trial."

The sad spectacle of Gaza's bombed-out airport doesn't deter Palestinians from hoping to someday have another airport of their own.

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