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Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson and Lisa Morrison Butler, Chicago's Commissioner of the Department of Family and Support Services, discuss the recent spike of violence in the city.

Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin talks about Chicago after more than 700 homicides in 2016. He says there's not one solution, but the city does need federal funds to grow the police force.

Congressman Danny Davis is a Democrat representing Illinois's 7th District, which includes some Chicago neighborhoods hardest hit by gun violence. His own grandson was shot and killed last November.

Chicago saw a record number of murders in 2016. With more than 700 homicides, there is more than one issue that led to this problem.

The sheriff's office in Oconee County, Ga., caught a runaway llama, after a caller reported that a "baby camel" had escaped. Chief Deputy Lee Weems talks about the county's loose llama problem.

In this week's sports roundup: The start of NFL playoffs, the fate of running back Joe Mixon, who was caught on video punching a woman in 2014, and a 105-year-old Frenchman still on his bike.

Lawmakers have lots of questions for Donald Trump's pick for secretary of state, Rex Tillerson. The former ExxonMobil CEO has done business around the world, including with Russian President Putin.

Research about senior citizens by the University of California, San Francisco finds people who are lonely have a higher mortality rate. Companionship may be more important than income or health.

Jason Lewis was a conservative radio host in Minnesota and was recently elected to represent his state in the U.S. House of Representatives. He talks about his legislative priorities.

A shooting at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport left five people dead, and raises new questions about airport security. Aviation security expert Jeff Price explains.

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