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The 23-year-old founder says sci-fi writers love to use virtual reality as a backdrop for conflict, but the future is "probably not going to be nearly as interesting."

Belgian playwright Ismael Saidi is taking his anti-radicalization message to schools in heavily Muslim neighborhoods. He finds extremism still has appeal, even after last week's terror attacks.

Belgium is divided linguistically, culturally and politically. Yet the Brussels bombings have also brought citizens together in ways they hadn't expected.

NPR's congressional correspondent Ailsa Chang explains what happened Monday at the Capitol complex, where a man with a weapon entered the Visitor Center and was shot by Capitol police.

The U.S. Capitol went on lockdown after reports of shots fired. Paul Singer, Washington correspondent for USA Today, was having coffee in the cafe at the time. He describes what happened next.

After a suicide bombing ripped through a crowded park on Easter, Pakistan has declared a three-day mourning period. Meanwhile, authorities are trying to track down those responsible for the attack.

More Americans are looking for a second home — on wheels. After crashing hard in the recession, RV sales have rebounded and are on track to approach record levels this year.

A recent Japanese study shows the lazy ants play a critical role in colonies. They contribute when others die or drop out. The researcher says the same is true for humans. But is it?

Guilt still haunts a new mother who was addicted to opioids when she got pregnant. Once she was ready to ask for help, treatment programs that could handle her complicated pregnancy were hard to find.

Microsoft's artificial intelligence chatbot was supposed to mimic a teenage girl. Instead, internet trolls tricked it into spouting hate speech. BuzzFeed tech reporter Alex Kantrowitz explains how.

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