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Lukman Faily, the Iraqi ambassador to the U.S., speaks about Iraq's hopes for the American response to recent turmoil, as well as the conditions the U.S. has placed on its possible intervention.

Andy Marra writes passionate essays about her experiences as a transgender woman. For the regular segment 'In Your Ear,' she shares some of the jams that help get her thoughts on paper.

Law professor Randall Kennedy's memories of the Jim Crow South include his mother packing food to avoid stopping on long trips. He says the symbolism of these little moments is still important today.

When singer R. Kelly's teenager revealed himself as a transgender boy, the blogosphere erupted. Writer and activist Janet Mock discusses the do's and don'ts of writing about transgender minors.

President Obama is promoting new initiatives to improve education for Native American students. Ahniwake Rose, executive director of the National Indian Education Association, has the details.

As the violence in Iraq begins to close in on Baghdad, host Michel Martin learns more about the conflict from The Wall Street Journal's Farnaz Fassihi, and former U.S. interpreter Tariq Abu Khumra.

The Iraqi government was trying to verify a claim by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria that the group had killed hundreds of Shiite security forces.

When the drugs first appeared, U.S. law enforcement officials had a tough time figuring out what they contained and where they came from. One source was a lab in Shanghai.

There's a gold rush on in health information technology. Entrepreneurs and venture capitalists are betting on companies that aim to help consumers, insurers and providers save money.

A few weeks ago, U.S. Customs and Border Protection spotted an unfamiliar moth in a shipment of organic soybeans. It was a small victory in the effort to prevent the spread of exotic pests.

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