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The election countdown is on — so we've rounded up the education talking points of each candidate in case you have last-minute questions.

Miami claims bank foreclosures in 2008 targeted black and Latino homeowners. When they defaulted, property values fell, which meant a drop in taxes. The city wants the right to sue the banks.

Most scientists agree, climate change is perhaps the most serious issue facing our planet today. And yet, it's uniquely difficult for us to wrap our heads around. Hidden Brain explores why.

The former newspaper reporter was born in 1917, before women won the right to vote. She calls Hillary Clinton the most qualified presidential candidate she has seen in her lifetime.

They're too young to vote, but they're still getting out the vote. After learning about the history of voting and democracy in America, these young activists took their message to a college campus.

Hillary Clinton retains a broad, consistent and shallow lead over Donald Trump in battleground states. If her Blue Wall of states leaning her direction holds, she wins. If not, anything can happen.

Move over, epidurals, here comes nitrous oxide. After enjoying popularity in the U.S. for managing labor pain until the mid-20th century, it was dropped in favor of anesthesia. Now it's back.

Reno's tenure was marked by tragedy and controversy. But she left office widely respected for her independence and accomplishments.

It's finally upon us. In just 48 hours tens of millions of voters will make their decision. NPR provides some final political analysis that voters should be thinking about as they head to the polls.

A lot of Americans say they're feeling anxious before Tuesday's election. Stanford University psychiatry professor Keith Humphreys talks about how to cope before and after the votes are cast.

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