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The government says free expression can combat radicalization. Yet a military court recently sentenced a man to 18 months in prison for a Facebook post deemed insulting to the United Arab Emirates.

Last year's release of a Senate report on CIA interrogation practices means lawyers for the accused Sept. 11 plotters can now discuss in court the treatment they say their clients endured.

Just three blocks from the U.S. Capitol, construction is underway for the Museum of the Bible, which will hold about 40,000 biblical artifacts from the family of Hobby Lobby President Steve Green.

Some companies are using surveys or brain games to assess what kind of workers candidates are. Employers say the tests can help reduce turnover and surface talent recruiters might otherwise overlook.

The debate over Keystone XL is nothing compared to the battle over the nation's first commercial oil pipeline. It transformed how energy was transported forever — but not without sabotage and threats.

Shifts in climate in the Middle Ages likely drove plague bacteria from gerbils in Asia to people in Europe, research now suggests. Rats don't deserve all the blame.

"I'm not ever going to forget what I've done," says a woman once convicted of prostitution. "But, at the same time, I don't want it thrown in my face every time I'm trying to seek employment."

Jordanians are now supportive of the military campaign against the Islamic State. But King Abdullah still faces domestic opponents, religious and secular, who chafe at restrictions at home.

Vocational education is enjoying a renaissance in many U.S. schools. In Nashville, Tenn., all high-schoolers are encouraged to take three career-training classes, regardless of college plans.

Roberta Jacobson, the U.S. official who will lead negotiations on reestablishing diplomatic ties with the Cubans, says that this will be a long journey, but she has hope for better relations.

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