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Sixty-six snakes in poor condition — sick and hungry — were found in a Baltimore apartment. An animal rescue shelter has put out a call for supplies.

The French are voting in regional elections. Voting last week put the far-right party, National Front, in the lead. NPR's Linda Wertheimer speaks with French political scientist Nicole Bacharan.

On Saturday, world leaders approved what's being hailed as a historic deal to reduce greenhouse emissions. NPR's Christopher Joyce gives the details.

Reflecting on his six years in office, the former attorney general talks with NPR's Michel Martin about what critics have called the most divisive administration and what's in store for him next.

It's been one year since the city of Detroit exited the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. New development is erupting downtown, but the city is still walking a financial tightrope.

The shooting in San Bernardino has focused attention on a "loophole" gun manufacturers use to get around weapons bans. It's the target of some lawmakers, but AR-15 owners say the gun is misunderstood.

Hany Farid co-developed the technology that tracks child pornography. He tells NPR's Scott Simon that similar software could be used to track terror content if tech companies were willing to use it.

Delegates at the U.N. climate talks in Paris have agreed on final draft text for a deal to curb global warming. NPR's Christopher Joyce joins NPR's Scott Simon with the latest from Paris.

Demographer Phillip Longman says that regional inequality divides America. He tells NPR's Scott Simon which cities are doing well, which ones are falling behind, and how the U.S. got to this point.

Drones are expected to be one of the most popular gifts this holiday season. As rules still play catch-up with the tech, here's a few rules new owners should know before flying their new devices.

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