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Many are without power or phone service. Their ability to reopen depends on the restoration of electricity, but also on whether employees can get to work through blocked roads and downed power lines.

A lot of people evacuated from Florida in anticipation of Hurricane Irma. Now they desperately want to come home, but the lack of fuel is making that tough.

Tur was at a rally in South Carolina when Trump called her name and pointed at her from the podium. Then, she says, "The entire place turns and they roar as one ... like a giant, unchained animal."

Irma is now a post-tropical cyclone, with top winds of only 25 mph — a far cry from the Category 4 storm that ravaged the Florida Keys on Sunday.

Americans owe more than ever before, with household debt hitting nearly $13 trillion. Some economists say the lessons of the credit bubble that led to the financial crisis are being forgotten.

French fishermen in Brittany and Calais say up to 80 percent of their haul is from British waters. Many fear financial ruin if their access is restricted after Brexit.

Demolition supervisor John Feal was working at ground zero 16 years ago when an 8,000-pound piece of steel crushed his foot. After being denied medical compensation, he became an advocate for others.

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to Tom Forward, Tampa's fire chief and emergency manager, about preparations for the storm.

In large swaths of Florida, Irma has brought dangerous floodwaters, knocking out power and turning human possessions into debris.

Forest fires have brought a smoky haze to the West, along with stinging eyes, sore throats and headaches to people far from flames. Unseen particles of ash also make it hard for some to breathe.

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