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An uptick in malnourished pups on the coast has rescue centers struggling to keep up. Changing weather patterns and warmer ocean waters could be to blame, but it's still too early to tell.

Researchers who helped develop powerful techniques warn that tweaking the genome is now easy. More public debate's needed, they say, before making changes in genes passed from parent to child.

The president's proposed budget sets the stage for Republicans to use a tool they've lacked until now: reconciliation. But they're not likely to win the game.

The bills in your wallet have one thing in common: they all feature photos of men. Now, a campaign hopes to replace Andrew Jackson's face on the 20 with someone like Susan B. Anthony or Rosa Parks.

Following the Bloody Sunday crackdown in Selma, Ala., Martin Luther King Jr. called for support across the U.S. People of different races and religions flocked to the state. Three of them look back.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu spoke with NPR's Steve Inskeep on the heels of a win for Netanyahu's Likud Party in parliamentary elections this week. Read a transcript of the interview.

Republicans argue the SNAP program would be more efficient if it were run by states. Meanwhile, the Obama administration is funding an initiative to move recipients into jobs.

Gov. Chris Christie is defending the state's $225 billion settlement for decades of contamination at two refineries as a "good deal." But Democratic lawmakers and environmentalists say otherwise.

The main forces fighting the self-declared Islamic State in Tikrit, Iraq, are Iran-backed Iraqi Shiite militias. Despite decades-long animosity between the nations, local Sunnis are joining them.

Britain's financial community was worried last year when the West began imposing sanctions on Russia. It turns out that only encouraged wealthy Russians to pump more money into Britain.

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