Listen to NPR Stories Online

Archaeologists have found well-preserved houses, textiles, tools, and even pots of food. They say a fire had destroyed the settlement. The people had to leave everything behind.

Turkish officials say a suicide bomber identified as a 28-year-old Syrian national targeted tourists. At least eight Germans died in the blast, Chancellor Angela Merkel says.

In the Navajo culture, teachers are revered and trusted. Tia Tsosie Begay is no exception, making sure her fourth-graders know that "someone believes in them."

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Monday about whether public employee unions should be able to collect some dues from nonmembers. A majority of the justices seemed to be leaning against it.

The Cavendish banana and other beloved varieties are threatened by a fungus that's spreading around the world. Scientists are trying to find new varieties that will be resistant to the disease.

Speaking with NPR, Matthias Mueller blamed the problem on a misunderstanding of U.S. law and said the company doesn't have an ethics problem. Less than a day later, he asked to clarify those remarks.

Bowie died Sunday after a long battle with cancer, according to a representative. He released his latest album, the critically acclaimed Blackstar, on Friday, which was also his 69th birthday.

Roughly 2.5 million Americans are addicted to heroin and opioids like Oxycontin. Researchers say addiction takes over the brain's limbic reward system, impairing decision making, judgment and memory.

At the Supreme Court on Monday, union opponents are seeking to reverse a 1977 decision that allows public employee unions to collect fees from those who don't join the union but are protected by it.

As the world refocuses its attention on North Korea after the rogue nation's fourth nuclear test, in neighboring South Korea, day-to-day life has barely been affected.

Pages

©2016 WLRH PUBLIC RADIO

Address

WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions

Phone

LOCAL:
(256) 895-9574

TOLL-FREE:
(800) 239-9574