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The Pentagon's ban on facial hair and religious headgear has long been an obstacle for Sikh men, who wear turbans and don't cut their hair. Sikhs are hoping a court ruling might lead to a rule change.

More than 60 U.S. citizens have been accused of joining or supporting the Islamic State in the past two years. NPR has documented their individual cases.

Last year, big fleets in the Bering Sea caught more halibut, by accident, than local fishermen caught on purpose. The big ships throw out that halibut; the local fishermen make their living from it.

Accusations against police of a slowdown has heightened longstanding mistrust of police. While steps are being taken to rebuild that trust, that's hard to do when police are out combating violence.

Tim Cook didn't mention Google, Facebook or Twitter by name, but it's pretty clear those were the companies he meant. But is Apple faultless on privacy issues? It collects lots of data too.

As the city struggles with a surge in violence and the aftermath of Freddie Gray's death, Kurt Schmoke says that the roots of the problems run deep.

A competition in California is trying to ready robots for disaster response. But the bots have a ways to go.

In a fast-changing health crisis, South Korea's government is holding back key data amid calls for more openness. That's only adding to growing doubt that leaders can handle the situation.

It's been called the "Greece of the Caribbean." Puerto Rico is more than $72 billion in debt. But because it's not a state, it can't use bankruptcy protection to help it restructure its debt.

In the past week, cases of the Middle East respiratory syndrome have more than tripled in South Korea. Researchers now have a clue to why the outbreak has grown so large, so quickly.




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