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Social scientists recently made an interesting discovery: The wage gap between blacks and whites (working identical jobs) varies greatly by location.

In high-profile interviews published in 2012 and earlier this year, the former congressman spoke of the "sexting" that led to his 2011 resignation from Congress as being in the past. Tuesday, he admitted that the behavior continued at least well into 2012.

Are you addicted to technology? Do you check email obsessively, tweet without restraint or post on Facebook during Thanksgiving dinner? Many techies and marketers are tapping into powerful reward mechanisms in our brain to make their products as compelling and profitable as possible.

Commentator Frank Deford says our educational system should care more about encouraging good black students instead of using good black athletes.

The Mt. Charleston blue butterfly is only found in a couple of small patches high in Nevada's Spring Mountains. But the Carpenter 1 fire, which has been raging through the area since July 1, is threatening the land and scientists fear the fire could push the butterflies into extinction.

President Obama recently called on the nation to rally around young African-American men. But is that easier said than done? Host Michel Martin asks a panel of dads.

The number of part-time workers has roughly doubled in the last few years. For most of those employees, that means short hours, erratic schedules and low pay. Host Michel Martin talks with NPR's Marilyn Geewax, and fast-food worker Amere Graham, about the high costs of part-time work.

Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has outlined the options and risks of U.S. military involvement in Syria. Read his letter to the chairman of the Senate's Armed Services Committee.

London bookies are taking bets. James, George and Alexander are among the favorites. Louis, Henry and Arthur are drawing interest as well. What will it be?

Afghanistan's top political comedy sketch show mocks aspects of day-to-day life in hopes of shaming the government to clean up its act. The cast of Zang-e-Khatar, or Danger Bell, has tackled everything from corruption to bad roads, and they've received death threats for doing it.




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