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The price of copper is down 40 percent from four years ago. Arizona residents from smaller mining towns worry about job losses, but some companies are planning to expand in the state.

A few years ago, Nicaragua was almost totally dependent on imported fuel. Now the country's fierce winds, sun and volcanoes generate half the country's electricity, and perhaps 80 percent soon.

One in four abortions is induced with medications rather than a surgical procedure. But the process faces a growing number of legal restrictions, including a law in Ohio.

Recent scandals involving student athletes at Syracuse University and other prominent athletic departments, remind commentator Frank Deford of speakeasies during Prohibition.

The Southern Baptist Convention is quietly nudging its 16 million members to tie the knot at a younger age. Baptist leaders say that marriage should be considered a foundation of adult life.

Drugs made from proteins or antibodies are difficult for rival manufacturers to copy. The Food and Drug Administration just approved a copycat drug for cancer patients that shows it can be done.

Environmentalists and Democrats have launched investigations into the funding of climate skeptics. Some say the probes are necessary, while others worry they could rightly be seen as harassment.

A 2013 investigation found 10 people died in events related to the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Bloomberg reporter John Hechinger about SAE's troubled history.

Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake is one of seven Senate Republicans who did not sign a letter to Iran warning about a nuclear deal with the Obama administration. He speaks with NPR's Melissa Block.

As they try to reach a nuclear deal with Iran, the White House says it does want Congress to have a role — just not now. So, could Republican interference scuttle the whole thing?

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