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Each year the U.S. spends billions of dollars on unnecessary tests and treatments that result from inaccurate mammograms, some scientists say. They're calling for more selective screening.

Hannah Reynolds, a slave, was the only civilian killed in the Battle of Appomattox Court House during the Civil War. A new discovery suggests, contrary to earlier belief, that she died a free woman.

Zynga's former CEO is back, less than two years after leaving the company he founded. The company had a smash hit with Farmville on Facebook, but has struggled to stay current in new markets.

California is parched. Wells are running dry. Vegetable fields have been left fallow and lawns are dying. Who can we blame? From almonds to politicians to cheap water, here are seven candidates.

Hillary Clinton is expected to announce Sunday that she is formally a candidate for president. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to NPR's Tamara Keith, who will be covering Clinton's 2016 campaign.

Walter Scott was laid to rest Saturday, as the Charleston community wrestles with his shooting death. Activists want reform, but others warn against letting the situation become "another Ferguson."

President Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro shared a stage for the first time since the U.S. and Cuba began moving toward normalizing relations.

The war between Israel and Hamas completely destroyed nearly 10,000 homes in Gaza. Not one has been rebuilt. Others, like the Otaish family, are cramming into the rubble-strewn rooms that remain.

The northern long-eared bat has been designated as a threatened species, triggering new regulations to protect it. But oil and gas and agriculture organizations say those new rules will hurt them.

Writer Patrick Symmes traces the roots of Cuba's two-currency system — and the potential fallout when that system will be eliminated sometime in the next year.




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