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Does a citizen of any country — not just the good ole U.S.A. — have an obligation to support its national teams? According to Frank Deford, in our world of global entertainment, passports don't matter and taste should trump nationalism.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in a major case testing the use of prayer at government meetings. The case could produce some guidelines for the future after often conflicting rulings in the lower courts.

The power of the president and Congress to make treaties and enforce state compliance has been called into question in a case involving a woman who may have violated the chemical weapons treaty in an effort to poison her husband's mistress. The Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case Tuesday.

Leaders from tech giants like Google and PayPal say that the password as we know it is dead. So what's the future of authentication online? Apple is implementing fingerprint protection on iPhones, but questions linger about the security and feasibility of biometrics.

Scientists and hunters are worrying about a steady die-off in moose populations in North America. While scientists scramble to understand the causes, rural states including New Hampshire worry about economic impacts. Meanwhile, some states such as Maine, where moose remain robust, could benefit.

Rob Ford said it happened during the past year, perhaps during a "drunken stupor." Over the weekend, the embattled politician apologized but vowed to continue on as mayor.

Hundreds of people have been killed in northern Nigeria this year. The violence is blamed on Boko Haram, an extremist group that claims to be fighting against westernization. Host Michel Martin learns more from NPR's Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, who recently visited the town where Boko Haram was born.

Big box retailer Target said it will remove questions about prior arrests on its job applications, but many companies still ask. Host Michel Martin speaks with Madeline Neighly from the National Employment Law Project and Elizabeth Milito from the National Federation of Independent Businesses about the pros and cons of the practice.

The U.S. Department of Justice recently announced $6.7 million in grants to provide more legal defense services for the indigent. But will the money really help with what some critics call overworked, underpaid, and poorly trained public defenders? Host Michel Martin asks law professor Eve Primus and Jonathan Rapping of Gideon's Promise.

The cancellations are making some people angry and many anxious. Opponents of the health law feel vindicated. They all cite the conflict between the cancellation notices and President Obama's repeated promise that people who like their existing health coverage could keep it.

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