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Twenty-three students from Columbia and Barnard say that the university is mishandling allegations of sexual assault. They filed federal complaints with the Department of Education on Thursday.

Reports of what transpired during the Ukrainian offensive are stirring some confusion. Fewer people died than initially reported, and life appears normal in the allegedly besieged city of Slovyansk.

Scientists tracking the ancestry of whooping cough say it arose abruptly in humans about 500 years ago, caused by a mutated bacterium that once lived only in animals. Genetic tricks helped it spread.

Both rancher Cliven Bundy and the New York Police Department had a rough week in the spotlight. The Barbershop guys weigh in on the risks of talking or tweeting too much.

Native American-themed mascots are at the center of a growing national debate, including the Cleveland Indians mascot, Chief Wahoo. Sports blogger Pete Pattakkos talks about pushing for change.

The Havasupai Native American tribe celebrated Blood Victory Day this week. That's the anniversary of their legal victory over researchers who misused members' blood samples without proper consent.

Tensions remain high in Ukraine, and there are also concerns that anti-Semitism is taking root during the political crisis. Richard Brodsky of Demos discusses the issue.

The Supreme Court handed down major decisions on some controversial cases this week. David Savage of the Los Angeles Times and Amy Howe of SCOTUSblog discuss the rulings and what's next.

India's Bollywood film industry is increasingly reaching a world-wide audience. To highlight the international appeal, the industry holds its annual awards ceremony every year outside of India.

Yousef al-Khattab was born Jewish but became a Muslim and put extremist propaganda on the Web. On the eve of sentencing for terrorism charges, he tells NPR his actions were "stupid" and "wrong."

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