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Wrecked infrastructure is making it hard for Filipino Americans to find out the status of family members affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jessica Petilla, a Filipino doctor in New York who has immediate family in the hard hit province of Leyte.

In Tacloban, a city of more than 220,000 people, some aid trucks are being looted as they arrive. Desperate for food, water and other essentials, many people are taking matters into their own hands.

It's the moment many victims of former Boston mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger have been waiting decades for. In federal court in Boston on Wednesday, relatives of those killed by Bulger will face the former gangster and describe their pain.

The owner of the Miami Dolphins says he will meet Wednesday with the player who has accused teammates of harassment. Frank Deford says the allegations represent just the most recent disgrace for football.

Emery Go Round is a free shuttle, provided by businesses in Emeryville, Calif. Not only did the popular shuttle help solve one of the most annoying problems for transportation planners known as the last mile, it helped the city reinvent itself as a home to headquarters for Pixar, Jamba Juice and Peet's Coffee.

Rather than traffic jams, kayak commuter Stephen Linaweaver has to look out for container ships. Every day, he paddles in his blue boat from the Port of Oakland to his job in San Francisco. His route may not be shorter than yours — but yours probably doesn't include harbor seals.

Afghanistan's rugged terrain and limited roads make military aircraft essential for troop movement, delivering supplies and medevac. The fledgling Afghan air force has a limited number of pilots, planes and spare parts, and NATO says it will take at least three more years to build up the force.

Twenty-nine lawmakers are supposed to come up with a long-term budget deal by mid-December. They meet again Wednesday around a conference table, facing huge hurdles and led by two people who couldn't be more different: Democratic Sen. Patty Murray of Washington state and Republican Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin.

Filipino TV reporter David Santos describes what it was like to ride out Typhoon Haiyan and then to see the devastation. In the area where he was, Santos says, law and order quickly broke down.

As governments and aid groups rush help to the scene, they're confronting epic devastation. The top U.S. commander there has flown over the areas where Typhoon Haiyan hit. It looks "like a bomb went off," Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy tells Morning Edition.

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