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A Maryland gun shop owner has backed off on a plan to sell the nation's first smart gun after receiving death threats and protests from gun rights advocates.

Hundreds of thousands are out of work, yet employers say they struggle to fill positions. Oil refineries in L.A. often have temporary work, but even entry-level jobs require specialized training.

The U.S. wants Europe to enforce economic sanctions against Russia over its push into Ukraine, but the Pentagon itself is reluctant to stop trading with Moscow.

Harry McAlpin became the first black White House reporter in 1944, though he was excluded from joining the Correspondents' Association. Decades later, he'll be be honored at the group's centennial.

The Hall of Famer calls the punishment for Donald Sterling's racist remarks wise and just, but wonders why the NBA tolerated the Clippers owner's "shameful record" for so many years.

California Chrome is a flashy red horse with a big white blaze down his face. Unlike his competition, he's from humble origins, but more important than his breeding is his speed.

The NBA's ban on Clippers owner Donald Sterling has drawn approval all around. ESPN's Howard Bryant tells NPR's Scott Simon that with such heinous remarks, the league may not have had much choice.

The April jobs report came in much better than expected, though the shrinking labor force leaves some unanswered questions.

In the latest round of litigation, Samsung has been ordered to pay $119.6 million to Apple. It was a mixed verdict. The jury found that both sides violated each other's patents.

International observers have been freed by pro-Russian forces in eastern Ukraine. Correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson speaks to NPR's Scott Simon about their release and new military action.

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