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California is home to one of the largest Filipino immigrant communities in the United States. It's also the center of a large fundraising and outreach effort for victims of Typhoon Haiyan that has ravaged the Philippines.

The conglomerate is launching new networks — targeted at diverse audiences and run by Sean Combs, Magic Johnson and Robert Rodriguez — to satisfy an agreement made with the FCC when the company merged with NBCUniversal.

They are being held by a militia paid to deal with the flow of illegal immigrants into and through Libya. Most will be deported. Libya has long been a magnet for migrants from the region. European countries are now criticizing its policies, but Libyan authorities say they need help to secure the country's borders.

New ordinances adopted in the South Florida city require that new homes feature freshwater cisterns and be built higher than the current flood plain level. Three years ago, Key West joined other Florida cities planning for the impact of climate change. Says Key West's planning director, "We are in all senses of the word, vulnerable to sea level rise."

As the U.S. recovers from the Great Recession, one fact that's emerging is that while jobs are coming back, most of these jobs are either high- or low-paying jobs. Middle-class jobs are not coming back, and it's evident in towns across the Midwest like Lincoln, Ill.

The South American country was the last place in the Americas to abolish slavery and that period coincided with a boom in the then new medium of photography. what resulted is arguably the largest archive of photographs of slavery in the world, and that is giving new insight to academics and ordinary Brazilians on the country's brutal past.

Criminal lawyers increasingly turn to brain science to explain their clients' actions. It's a tactic that's kept defendants out of jail. But neuroscientists say scans can be easily misused or misinterpreted. Now judges must decide whether the evolving science is being used in a sensible way.

As horrific as Haiyan has been, the disaster likely won't reach the same level of death and injury as the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 or Haiti's 2010 quake, disaster specialists say. Better communication systems in the disaster area are one reason why.

Medical tourism was expected to be huge in 2013, and countries like Colombia, which has seen huge improvements in safety and tourism, decided they wanted in on the action. In recent years they've been building facilities specifically designed for medical tourists. But the numbers have not quite met projections.

More than 600,000 have been left homeless and hungry by the devastating storm. In response, humanitarian agencies are mounting the largest relief operation since the Haitian earthquake in 2010. The biggest challenge right now is getting the basics — clean water and food — to the hardest hit areas.

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