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Paris streets are often too dangerous for kids to learn to ride, and most parents have no room to store bikes in their apartments. So the city has started renting bikes for the smallest Parisians.

More than six years after the housing crash, the housing market may be better-than-dismal, but the slog back to normal is still disappointingly long and slow.

Sunni militants were originally welcomed when they rolled into the Iraqi city of Mosul, but now there's a power struggle between the local tribes, Sunnis and Saddam Hussein's former Baathist party.

Iraqi and Syrian refugees in Athens find themselves in the only major EU capital without a formal mosque. Muslims are celebrating Ramadan at a time when xenophobia in Greece is on the rise.

The Supreme Court is expected to decide Monday whether healthcare plans must cover contraceptives, as legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg tells NPR's Don Gonyea.

Nigeria's rate of child marriage is among the highest in the world. Michelle Faul of the Associated Press tells NPR's Don Gonyea that the rate of girls being divorced and abandoned is rising too.

Space is a premium in space. So NASA ended up folding two rovers inside a shipping container, and then unfolding them when they landed. This story originally aired on All Things Considered on June 9.

The creative director for BioShock Infinite, one of 2013's biggest video games, says as technology improves, so does the ability for games to tell complex stories with rich narrative structures.

Middle East correspondent Alice Fordham has the latest from Iraq, where she says Sunni militants are unlikely to conquer Baghdad outright. She speaks to NPR's Arun Rath from the Iraqi capital.

Harley-Davidson has rolled out a prototype of its first battery-powered motorcycle. It's sporty and speedy, but quieter than your average Harley — and you'll need to charge it about every 50 miles.

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