Listen to NPR Stories Online

Over the past year, the economy had added more than 200,000 jobs each month. That streak broke in the most recent report, as growth dipped to just 126,000 jobs — less than economists had anticipated.

People fleeing the fighting in the separatist cities of Donetsk and Luhansk are big burden for Ukraine's financially strained government, but Kharkiv residents are stepping up to help.

It's the end of an era: After nearly a century, the Streit's matzo factory is leaving Manhattan's Lower East Side. This Passover will be its last there. Streit's plans to move to a new factory.

President Obama says he welcomes a "robust debate" on the Iran framework from Congress and the American people. He's already getting one.

Gunmen have attacked a university in eastern Kenya, killing at least 14 people. The militant group al-Shabab has claimed responsibility. NPR's Gregory Warner offers the latest from Nairobi.

The new movie Woman In Gold tells the true story of Maria Altmann, who fought her way to the Supreme Court to force the Austrian government to give back a painting of her aunt, Adele Bloch-Bauer.

Tens of thousands of people are suffering after losing their jobs in the wake of wide-scale corruption at Brazil's state oil company. Scores of politicians and executives have been implicated.

African-Americans are changing their minds about guns, and Detroit's black police chief supports responsible concealed-carry. Still, some remain convinced that having a gun will lead to problems.

Wal-Mart has long been criticized for low pay and erratic work schedules. So when the retailer arrives in a community, it stirs controversy — but it also brings jobs and low prices.

The case of co-pilot Andreas Lubitz has focused attention on what Lufthansa, or any employer, can really know about an employee's state of mind. Requiring a psychological evaluation has risks, too.




WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions


(256) 895-9574

(800) 239-9574