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Organizers of the South Boston St. Patrick's Day Parade say they won't be allowing a gay rights group to join their parade. But Boston Mayor Martin Walsh says he'll keep fighting for LGBT inclusion.

In Chicago, a boycott has begun to protest the extent of standardized testing. Parents and teachers are saying that a recent test is useless, so hundreds are opting out or refusing to administer it.

In Moscow, Russian President Vladimir Putin defended his position on Ukraine. In a news conference, Putin denied that Russian troops are in Crimea but reserved the right to use force in Ukraine.

The once-futuristic concept is closer than ever to becoming a reality. Parallel parking? Let the car find the perfect approach. Squeezing into a tight space? Hop out and use your smart phone.

Contradicting reports from the ground, the Russian leader insists that the armed men are "local self-defense forces." He also says Russia has no plans to annex Crimea.

The sharp decline in payments coincides with increased scrutiny of drug marketing. Later this year, federal law will also require that drugmakers disclose the amount of money they give to doctors.

People around the world are eating a wider range of foods. But as a whole, we are increasingly reliant on a few crops. Researchers say that increases the risk of agricultural disaster.

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act are working in Chicago and several other cities to sign up cabbies for health insurance as the March 31 open enrollment deadline nears.

The EU wants the U.S. to prohibit food makers from using names with historical ties to Europe. That means cheeses like Parmesan and Brie sold in the U.S. may have to find new names.

The former U.S. senator, now head of the Heritage Foundation, reflects on the state of the Republican Party, the Tea Party and what he thinks it will take to change Washington.

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