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Two species of fern that diverged 60 million years ago are as evolutionarily distant as, say, elephants and manatees. Nonetheless, the two species recently produced a hybrid, say astounded botanists.

A levee project would cordon off lucrative farmland along the Mississippi River in southeastern Missouri. But towns in Illinois say that puts them at risk of flooding while protecting rich farmers.

Oklahoma oil is expensive to produce, so the sharp drop in prices has forced many drilling companies to cut jobs. If prices stay low, the pain could spread to the banks that finance the oil industry.

Research shows that missing school in the crucial early days of school leads to problems later on. In Los Angeles, educators are working to raise kindergarten attendance.

Once a booming timber area, Grays Harbor County is the site of three proposed oil terminals. The local fishing industry sees the uptick in oil movement as a big risk, with limited economic benefits.

The Department of Homeland Security, an agency repeatedly criticized for internal mismanagement and bloat, is the cornerstone of the new White House initiative to fight cybercrime.

Last weekend, more than 40 swimmers from around the country competed in the inaugural American winter swimming championship in northern Vermont. They swam in a two lane pool cut into an icy lake.

It's hard to know when to take violent language seriously online. But when Jonathan Hutson saw an anonymous threat to an unnamed school on Twitter, he couldn't let it go.

After a pilot was burned alive by the Islamic State, Jordanians have become much more supportive of its role in the war against the extremist group.

A year ago, Kiev's central square was the center of the protest movement that ousted Ukraine's president. The square remains a home for free speech, including criticism of the current government.

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