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Economists say strong home sales this spring could drive job creation, as well as boost personal wealth and consumer confidence.

As a black graphic designer, Xavier Ruffin wanted to like the show Mad Men, but was disappointed with its portrayal of black people. His Web series Mad Black Men is part spoof, part dramedy.

For the second year, hundreds of visual-effects workers will be protesting instead of celebrating Hollywood's big night. They say subsidies luring studios abroad are draining the profession.

Despite federal protections, slow-moving wild donkeys are being targeted, and the shooters are getting away with it. Originally gold miners' pack animals, burros are symbolic of the American West.

Bertha, which got stuck digging a Seattle highway tunnel, is 60 feet below ground and can't move forward — or backward. Now a rescue plan is underway to fix the five-story-tall machine.

In Michigan, Debbie Dingell is announcing that she will run for Congress in the district represented by her husband since 1959. John Dingell recently announced his own retirement.

The Clinton Presidential Library is releasing thousands formerly secret documents that date back to the Clinton presidency. They offer close look at the operations of the Clinton White House.

Ousted Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych made his first public speech since fleeing the country. Financial Times reporter Courtney Weaver discusses the new conference and its reception in Crimea.

Secret documents provided by Edward Snowden reveal a program shared by the National Security Agency and the UK's surveillance agency. Spencer Ackerman of The Guardian explains "Optic Nerve."

Refugees once fled to Syria. Now, record numbers are fleeing from it. And the exodus is straining the stability of neighbors who are struggling to support both their own citizens and the displaced.

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