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New federal numbers show that amid falling gas prices, Americans drove a record 3.15 trillion vehicle miles last year. This also means more pollution and traffic gridlock.

David Greene speaks with National Security Editor Phil Ewing about the proposal President Obama delivered to Congress for closing the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

For more than 300 years, children have performed kabuki, Japan's classical theater, in the village of Damine. But as residents age or leave for cities, Damine is running out of young performers.

Left-leaning economists and Democratic analysts are sparring over Sanders' proposal of health care for all, paid for by the government. Some who like his aspiration say the numbers don't add up.

Scientists say the buzz picked up by hydrophones in the Pacific may be caused by "fish farts" — the emptying of air bladders that let clouds of fish rise and fall during daily hunts for food.

Gulf states are starting to spend the first of billions from BP's settlements and fines for the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history — but not all the money is being used for restoration.

The former NSA chief said the intelligence agencies were convinced that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. Hayden discusses his role in an interview with NPR's Robert Siegel.

Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx says standards must be developed, such as determining whether licensed drivers will be required. But he says potential safety benefits will be a big advantage.

Two businessmen — one of whom was born in Cuba — have been granted permission to build the first U.S. factory on the island nation since 1960. They plan to produce small tractors for Cuban farmers.

Author Sonia Shah says that urbanization and air travel put the global population at an increased risk for disease. "Zika is a great example of how new pathogens are emerging today," she says.

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