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The U.S. Department of Justice recently announced $6.7 million in grants to provide more legal defense services for the indigent. But will the money really help with what some critics call overworked, underpaid, and poorly trained public defenders? Host Michel Martin asks law professor Eve Primus and Jonathan Rapping of Gideon's Promise.

The cancellations are making some people angry and many anxious. Opponents of the health law feel vindicated. They all cite the conflict between the cancellation notices and President Obama's repeated promise that people who like their existing health coverage could keep it.

The big news is expected to be from the gubernatorial races in New Jersey and Virginia. Other races to watch include mayoral contests in New York, Boston, Detroit and Minneapolis. Also, many states and localities have ballot initiatives — including whether the Astrodome should be torn down.

The reversal of a conservation law court decision to protect Michigan's Au Sable River is an unintended outcome from large donations by anonymous funders funneled through tax-exempt organizations. Known as 501(c)4s, these groups are becoming a vehicle of choice for big donors to hide large political donations.

About 22 percent of sun-like stars in our galaxy may have planets orbiting them that are about the size of Earth and bathed in similar amounts of sunlight, according to a new analysis of data from the Kepler Space Telescope.

A new study published finds that women who followed a Mediterranean-style of eating in their 50s were about 40 percent more likely to reach the later decades without developing chronic diseases and memory or physical problems, compared to women who didn't eat as well.

States have spent big on setting up their health insurance exchanges. But figuring out where the money is going can be difficult because some states don't release the information. The contractor running Connecticut's marketplace call center hasn't had to reveal pricing.

After her husband cheated, Carol Anne Bond started spreading toxic chemicals on surfaces the other woman might touch. She was caught and convicted of violating the Chemical Weapons Convention. But does a law implementing an international treaty apply when the victim's only injury was a thumb burn?

Roy Choi changed the food truck fad forever when he and his friend started selling Korean barbecue tacos outside clubs in Los Angeles. He talks about his life and his food truck foundations in his new book, L.A. Son: My Life, My City, My Food.

Democrat Bill de Blasio is poised to become the next mayor of New York, in part because he made income inequality the central issue of his campaign. His "tale of two cities" narrative has resonated with voters. But there's debate about what he could do as mayor to narrow the income gap.

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