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It's not GoFundMe or Crowdrise but megadonors who are behind the rise in charitable giving. NPR's Ailsa Chang hears from Chuck Collins of the Institute for Policy Studies about the downside to this.

Gerrymandering is a venerable American tradition. NPR's Ailsa Chang gets the latest on court challenges to this practice from Nicholas Stephanopoulos, a lawyer for a plaintiff in one of the cases.

Princeton professor Aaron Friedberg, a former Asian affairs adviser to vice president Cheney, shares his concerns about Donald Trump's China policy with NPR's Ailsa Chang.

Researcher Sara Nash tells NPR's Ailsa Chang why it's never to late to quit smoking. She's one of the authors of a new NIH-AARP study.

The Red Car, the latest novel by Marcy Dermansky, features a protagonist who's haunted by a former boss. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Dermansky about the fantastical and dark novel.

Many parents and teachers report that schools won't use the word dyslexia. Why might this be? And what is the Department of Education doing about it?

President-elect Donald Trump spoke with Taiwan's leader, Tsai Ying-Wen, breaking nearly four decades of diplomatic protocol and threatening to upset U.S. relations with China.

In North Carolina, Republican incumbent Gov. Pat McCrory trails his Democratic challenger Roy Cooper by 10,000 votes. One of the largest counties has a recount this weekend.

Trump's pick of retired Gen. James Mattis as defense secretary will require Congress to bypass a certain law. Professor Peter Feaver of Duke University discusses the law's origins.

U.K. Secretary of State for Defence Michael Fallon discusses anticipated changes to the U.S.-U.K. relationship with the incoming Trump administration and his pick for defense secretary, James Mattis.

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