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South Korea likes to point the finger at China for its pollution woes, but that's not the whole story. New research is examining how much Korean smog is caused by neighbors and how much is home-grown.

Supermarket tomatoes have a terrible reputation. But the industry is evolving. More than half of supermarket tomatoes now are grown in greenhouses or "shade houses," and flavor is improving.

Loans and grants often aren't enough to cover all the expenses of a college education. For many students the struggle to afford school means long work hours and even skipping meals.

Many combatants return from the battlefield with hearing loss. The U.S. Army has begun deploying a "smart earplug" system that can protect hearing without blocking crucial sounds.

A synthetic version of the human genetic blueprint might used for a wide range of medical research, scientists say. But it's far from reality, and comes with big ethical and safety questions.

Anne Barnard of The New York Times and Thanassis Cambanis from The Century Foundation fell in love when they were reporting on the war in Iraq. Now based in Beirut, they continue to cover the region.

In North Jersey, it's called Taylor Ham and in South Jersey, it's pork roll. The governor and legislature are taking sides. Even President Obama brought it up during a visit to the Garden State.

The journalists' union has battled the government for decades. But journalists say the current period is the worst they can recall, with three top members of the union facing trial on Saturday.

Afghan commandos, supported by U.S. special operations forces, launched a raid into a village contested by the Taliban. The raid permitted an aid convoy to make progress after nearly a month.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Thursday is announcing proposed regulations which aim to stop some predatory lending practices.

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