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It's getting easier to cancel a health insurance policy if you get a new job or have other life changes. And new parents can buy coverage for the baby after he or she is born. But there are exceptions to many rules in the Affordable Care Act, so it's worth checking out how they affect you.

It's estimated that only about 10 percent of K-12 schools teach computer science. Some companies are trying to fill a void in American public education by teaching kids computer programming basics. The push comes amid projections that there will be far more tech sector jobs than computer science graduates to fill them.

Electronic cigarettes are often billed as safe and helpful for adult smokers trying to kick their habit. But the CDC says 1 in 5 young teens who try an e-cigarette have never smoked tobacco. And between 2011 and 2012, the devices doubled in popularity among middle-school and high-school students.

After the Jan. 9 chemical spill into West Virginia's Elk River, more than 300,000 people lost access to clean, safe drinking water. Government authorities have said the water is now "usable" for all purposes including drinking, but many residents say they don't trust the water.

With medical marijuana legal in 20 different states, a "green rush" has started among venture capitalists looking to invest in the pot-related industry.

In the Central African Republic, Muslim rebels seized power last year and then lost it to Christian militias. France and other countries' peacekeeping troops are helping Muslims evacuate, as East Africa correspondent Gregory Warner tells NPR's Rachel Martin.

In some states, the overdose antidote known as Narcan is becoming more popular among law enforcement. Not the state of Maine; that state's governor is opposing a bill that would put Narcan in the hands of more first-responders.

Haiti has its first inductee into the College of Cardinals. Haitian Bishop Chibly Langlois is one of 19 men chosen by Pope Francis for elevation. Seven of the new group hail from the Americas, the Caribbean and Africa.

A recent Newsweek investigation found that at many colleges and universities, being open about a mental health disorder can mean getting kicked out of school. Newsweek reporter Katie J.M. Baker speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about the story.

A jury in Jacksonville, Fla., returned a mixed verdict Saturday in the trial of Michael Dunn, charged in the shooting death of teenager Jordan Davis. Unable to reach a verdict on the charge of murder, the jury found Dunn guilty on four other counts.

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