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One of the revolution's core promises was an egalitarian society. But as Cuba opens up, one of the unintended consequences may be more inequality.

Writer Gabrielle Glaser challenges the usefulness of Alcoholics Anonymous in April's issue of The Atlantic. The program's tenets aren't based in science, she says, and other options may work better.

French officials believe the co-pilot of the Germanwings plane that went down in the Alps intentionally crashed the plane. Steve Inskeep speaks with NPR's Eleanor Beardsley for the latest.

A drug that's effective in patients with certain forms of melanoma is being tested as a treatment for other cancers whose genetic code contains an identical mutation.

Egypt was ready to go to war over Ethiopia's planned Renaissance Dam. A new agreement has ended the tension. But that doesn't mean everyone's a winner.

A riot at a private immigration prison in Willacy County, Texas, forced officials to close the facility and relocate 2,800 inmates. But it also left the county with a $2.3 million budget shortfall.

Doctors who treat Medicare patients will face a huge cut, 21 percent, if Congress doesn't act by the end of the month. House leaders now think they fix a problem that has plagued Congress since 1997.

In December, Tania Bruguera planned a performance at Revolution Square. She ended up in jail and had her passport taken. Now she returns to the scene of her alleged crime. This time for an interview.

Henry Heinz was big into pickles before ketchup came along. James Kraft gave the world American cheese. (Ironically, he was Canadian.) Now, two companies that revamped how we eat will become one.

In South Florida, the world's two most destructive termite species could be mating because of climate change. Researchers say if the hybrids colonize, they could pose an even greater economic threat.




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