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A conviction can be fatal for a big company. So in some cases prosecutors have been holding off punishing firms that have broken the law. In return, the companies vow to clean up their act.

Even with the warm outflow from nearby power plants, the San Gabriel River's an odd new habitat choice. Volunteers and researchers are working to study and track the population that's popped up there.

Cancer treatment for kids has changed dramatically since the 1960s. Back then, doctors experimented with approaches that seemed promising but were also potentially toxic. Some survivors look back.

What's behind the curious food fad of mukbang, or live-streamed broadcasts of people eating endless amounts of food? The genre is so popular in South Korea that its stars pull in $10,000 a month.

Researchers say their study suggests that more diabetes is being detected in particular states because, thanks to Medicaid, more poor people have access to screening and care.

If you're trying out for a job, the one judging you may not be a person — it could be a computer. Algorithms are evaluating human voices to determine which ones are engaging, calming and trustworthy.

Medical researchers have made only modest progress treating the most common cancers since the war on cancer was declared in 1971. The disease has proved far more complicated than doctors had hoped.

The former secretary of state is expected to announce her presidential candidacy soon. In recent weeks, she's given speeches to women's groups, pointing to a likely shift in tone from 2008 to 2016.

Texas issues specialty license plates at the behest of private groups or individuals. At issue before the Supreme Court Monday is whether the state can reject messages that are offensive to some.

The year 2020 will be the first time the census will be available online. But the Census Bureau must persuade hard-to-reach groups to take the survey. So they're doing a practice run in Savannah, Ga.




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