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Dogs pay close attention to the emotion in our voices, but what about the meaning of words? A clever experiment with 250 canines shows that dogs understand more of our speech than previously thought.

Since the midterm elections, there has been a new batch of transfers from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and more releases are in the works. But a new GOP Congress could stall the drive to empty Guantanamo.

Actress Mae West was petite, but on screen — thanks to a pair of platform shoes — she looked larger than life. A show in Boston examines the fashion and jewelry of Hollywood's golden age.

Pope Francis will meet with Turkey's Muslim leaders and the head of the Orthodox Church in what may be the most challenging trip of his young papacy.

Highly reliant on oil imports, Spain's government is encouraging oil exploration off the coast of the Canary Islands. But locals say the drilling threatens the natural attractions that draw tourists.

The British author of best-selling detective stories has died at age 94. "In a sense, the detective story is a small celebration of reason and order in our very disorderly world," she told NPR.

The Ferguson Public Library has become a refuge for community during a difficult time. In response, donations to the library have reached "several orders of magnitude" higher than ever.

It wouldn't be Thanksgiving without football. The Chicago Bears face the Detroit Lions, the Philadelphia Eagles take on the Dallas Cowboys, and the Seattle Seahawks play the San Francisco 49ers.

Not surprisingly, many of the stories we heard from you were about food. You had issues roasting the turkey. Your mom found, um, a creative solution to making your bird golden-brown.

The average woman in Niger bears seven children — the world's highest birth rate. And the country can barely feed its current population. How do you convince people that smaller families are better?

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