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The "new" dinosaur — named Wendiceratops pinhornensis — lived about 79 million years ago and helps scientists understand the early evolution of the family that includes Triceratops.

We know very little about what goes into standardized tests, who really designs them and how they're scored. Take a peek into the nation's largest test-scoring facility in the country.

The U.S. and others said more than a decade ago that Sudan was committing genocide in Darfur. Despite a U.N. peacekeeping mission and genocide charges against Sudan's president, little has changed.

Greek banks have been closed for more than a week, and it's unclear when they will reopen. Many Greeks are worried that if the banks collapse, they will lose everything.

As the Obama administration looks to expand the number of employees eligible for overtime pay, more companies may curtail the use of email after hours to cut labor costs.

Ester and Walt Weaver are among the 177 people jailed after a fight between rival motorcycle clubs in May. They say the guns they carried are legal and they weren't part of the clubs or the violence.

The corporation has U.S. approval, and ships could head for Cuba beginning in May 2016. But travelers can't be just tourists. They have to fit into one of 12 government-established categories.

The Millennium Development Goals, set in 2000, revolutionized the fight against poverty. Now the world is setting Sustainable Development Goals. But critics say there may be too many priorities.

The women who trained on tanks and armored vehicles say they proved they belong. Such ground combat jobs will open to women in January unless the Marine Corps makes the case they should be closed.

It's a time-honored tradition in South Texas: Local candidates who need votes go to campaign workers known as politiqueras. But some of those workers are now charged with manipulating mail-in ballots.

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