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Iranians are hoping the recent election of more reformers to parliament will help improve the economy.

The Hokule'a, a Hawaiian double-hulled sailing canoe, arrives back in American waters for the first time since 2014. The canoe relies only on sails for power and the wind and the stars for navigation.

Spring is for the birds. And some are pretty odd. There's a bird that walks under water and another that impales its prey. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro speaks with Ray Brown from "Talkin' Birds."

Five months from now, the Olympics open in Brazil. Are the stadiums ready? Are the athletes? NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, who lives in Rio de Janeiro, talks to sport's correspondent, Tom Goldman.

Conservative Christians have surprised pundits with their support for Donald Trump. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro speaks with Bible translator and minister Jim Linzey about his endorsement.

The actress' latest role in "Hello, My Name is Doris" hits close to home: "The story really is a coming of age — of a woman of age." As for Fields, she welcomes the stages of old age with openness.

The league's plan, which needs approval from the players' union and both governments, would allow direct pickups of Cuban players — no defections — in exchange for cash support for the sport there.

A study of pregnant women in Rio de Janeiro lends credence to a suspected link between Zika and microcephaly and suggests the virus could cause other complications, including stillbirth.

A second big study affirms new thinking: Exposing high-risk kids to peanuts beginning in infancy reduces the chance of developing a peanut allergy. This peanut tolerance holds up as kids get older.

Kelly says his twin brother, Scott Kelly, who just returned to Earth after 340 days in space, was temporarily 2 inches taller. NASA is studying the pair to explore what spaceflight does to the body.

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