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In the aftermath of the 1989 oil spill off the Alaskan coast, scientists expected the worst damage to be short-lived. Instead, the spill shattered conventional wisdom about oil's affect on wildlife.

Border Patrol agents seem to be everywhere along the U.S. side of the Mexican border, and residents are also on guard. Yet amid distrust and heavy surveillance, there is compassion.

More Americans are hopping on a bus or taking a train to get to work. Public transit ridership in the U.S. is now at the highest that it has been in more than half a century.

Will the sanctions imposed by the U.S. and EU have serious economic consequences? NPR's Scott Simon takes up the question with Ian Bremmer, president of the Eurasia Group.

Isra al-Modallal is the first woman to be the public face of Hamas, the conservative group that rules the Palestinian territory. "Brilliant" is how one Gaza observer describes the decision.

Russia has implied that it may act as a spoiler in the Iran nuclear talks in retaliation for Washington-imposed sanctions over events in Ukraine. Correspondent Peter Kenyon joins Scott Simon.

The profile of the judiciary has already changed significantly under the president, especially when it comes to the diversity of the bench.

A Turkish court is trying to ban Twitter, setting off condemnation of the government's increasingly heavy hand and prompting Turks to find a workaround for the social media site.

Dr. Bernd Gans, the president of the Air France 447 Families Association, discusses an open letter that the group wrote in support of the families of passengers on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

As Russia has consolidated its control over Crimea, the Ukrainian government in Kiev has sent mixed messages. Many troops on the ground are feeling increasingly abandoned, with no clear orders at all.

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