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And, author Kwei Quartey adds, "The police may not find you for a little while." That's why he chose to set his second Detective Inspector Dawson book in Ghana's capital.

The wealthy Ricketts family includes conservatives and a liberal, activists and a candidate. Between them, they raise and spend a lot of political money — and exemplify how the system has changed.

Gabrielle Nuki hopes to be a doctor someday. So when the 16-year-old found out that she could work as a fake patient helping to train medical students, she jumped at the chance.

The U.S. military's attention to PTSD is well-documented but Kurdish fighters living with the same disorder haven't received nearly as much care. Arun Rath talks to journalist Jenna Krajeski.

One of the lawyers for self-proclaimed Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed resigned from the Army last week. He tells NPR the government is putting on a "show trial."

The sad spectacle of Gaza's bombed-out airport doesn't deter Palestinians from hoping to someday have another airport of their own.

School districts are beginning to cope with the recent influx of new students from Central America. Many have little education and most are just beginning to learn English.

Detroit is preparing to dig itself out of the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. The legal approach Detroit uses to re-create itself will have far-reaching implications for other cities.

Maybe we don't need to eat our Wheaties. Linda Wertheimer talks to Emily Dhurandhar, lead author of a study that finds breakfast may not be the most important meal of the day.

Liberia is the country hardest hit by the Ebola virus outbreak. Aid is trickling in, but it is not enough. NPR's Linda Wertheimer speaks to Wall Street Journal reporter Drew Hinshaw in the capital, Monrovia.

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