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Three years ago, the court struck down mandatory life sentences in cases involving juvenile defendants. Should that ruling be applied retroactively to those sentenced to life long ago?

Twitter is going after news media that share highlights of U.S. football games without sports organizations' permission. The move shines a spotlight on the notion of fair use of copyrighted content.

A study estimated that 99 percent of cable TV subscribers rent their set-top boxes and pay on average $231 a year to do so. Groups want to make it easier for consumers to own similar devices.

Twenty years ago, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was killed by a Jewish religious zealot. Dan Ephron, author of Killing a King, discusses the assassination and its effect on the peace process.

As the military response to the Islamic State heats up, an ideological front is opening against the group. They're using social media to explain why ISIS' interpretation of the Koran is wrong.

In 2012 the U.S. Supreme Court limited life sentences without parole for juveniles who commit murder. On Tuesday the panel will hear arguments on whether the ruling should apply retroactively.

Barbara Byrd-Bennett is expected to appear in court on Tuesday. She is accused of taking $2.3 million in kickbacks for steering no-bid contracts to a former employer.

In his new article, The New Yorker's Malcolm Gladwell uses a well-known theory to contrast early school shooters back in the 1990s with shooters today.

A new study of drinking water in areas where fracking is used to extract natural gas found that contamination is not common and it probably did not come from deep underground.

Ahead of Tuesday's first Democratic presidential debate, we revisit the facts of the Benghazi investigation and how it became potentially damaging to the political fortunes of Hillary Clinton.

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