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Millennials are often dubbed "young invincibles" for their propensity to stay healthy, and forgo health insurance. Host Michel Martin speaks with Kaiser Health News correspondent Jenny Gold about how the Affordable Care Act will impact "invincibles," and how they might be the key to the program's success.

The impasse continues. Meanwhile, parts of the federal government remain closed. Among the latest developments: President Obama has invited leaders of both parties to a Wednesday evening meeting at the White House.

On Sept. 27, 1988, Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson was stripped of his 100-meter gold medal when tests showed a performance-enhancing drug in his system. As Alex Rodriguez appeals his illegal doping ban from Major League Baseball, Frank Deford reflects on a historical moment of drug use among athletes.

The allegations have shaken people in Nairobi, who just a week ago were hailing the soldiers as heroes after Islamic militants stormed an upscale mall and killed dozens. President Uhuru Kenyatta has vowed to set up a commission to look into lapses in intelligence and security, and to investigate the accusations.

Many users trying to sign up for the new health care marketplace on Tuesday hit technical glitches and slow downs. Programmers say the tech powering Obamacare online can be very complicated. And the administration urges patience.

The number of people who leave their countries to work abroad is soaring, according to the United Nations, which is meeting on the subject this week. More than 200 million people now live and work outside their country of origin, up from 150 million a decade ago.

There was a party atmosphere at Affordable Care Act events both in California, where the law has been embraced by the state government, and in Virginia, where it has been resisted. But consumers will have very different experiences in the two states.

The grain hasn't quite taken off yet, partly due perception issues. But farmers are optimistic that the grain, which is high in protein and gluten-free, can compete with quinoa.

Gun sellers in the state say they couldn't keep their shelves stocked in the days leading up to the implementation of the law, which takes effect Tuesday. The legislation requires gun buyers to be fingerprinted, limits bullet purchases and bans the sale of many assault weapons.

As the government endures a partial shutdown, we hear stories from people around the country whose lives have been affected. For additional perspective, host Michel Martin is joined by NPR business editor Marilyn Geewax, and Sudeep Reddy, of The Wall Street Journal.

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