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The so-called "omnibus" package of all 12 annual spending bills has more money in it than what Congressional Republicans wanted, but less than what President Obama had asked for. There is some disappointment with the measure on both sides of the aisle, but this time nobody is talking about forcing another government shutdown.

In a deal worth some $16 billion, the Japanese beverage giant Suntory is buying Beam, the maker of Jim Beam bourbon and the owner of well-known American brands such as Maker's Mark. Industry leaders say it's a reflection of bourbon's exploding popularity in Asian markets, but some are wondering if the new owners will preserve bourbon's Kentucky heritage.

Russian officials say high-tech surveillance and the deployment of tens of thousands of troops are part of the most extensive Olympic security measures ever. The region surrounding host city Sochi is home to Europe's deadliest insurgency, and Islamist militants have proven their ability to strike.

Kate Byroade had always known her ancestors were slave owners, but she had been told their slaves were treated well. Understanding the truth took her on a difficult lifelong journey. Americans are shy "about calling out the great wickedness of slavery," she says. "We should not be."

Do boundaries meant to protect patients and staff outside abortion clinics violate the free speech rights of anti-abortion protesters? In 2000, the Supreme Court said no in a case involving "floating" buffer zones. But the issue is back before the court — which now has more conservative justices.

Mayor Danny Jones says he's not "even sure they cared what happened to the public." Jones adds the West Virginia capital is considering taking legal action.

The Senate is still struggling to find a way to pay for an extension of unemployment benefits for those out of work for 26 weeks or more. Majority leader Harry Reid agreed to bring up five Democratic and five Republican amendments in hopes to winning enough Republicans over to get to the 60 votes needed for passage.

The drought in California has become so severe that cities are preparing to impose restrictions on water use in homes. In Northern California, the water level in Folsom Lake is so low that remnants of Gold Rush life, which have long been underwater, are now exposed and being collected.

Celebrations in Tunisia on Tuesday are marking the third anniversary of the revolution that led to the ouster of its dictator and set in motion the regional uprisings of the Arab Spring. As huge crowds gather in the streets of the capital, members of the National Assembly are voting on a new constitution that has the approval of both secular groups, which are popular in the capital, and Islamists, whose strongholds are in the countryside. New parliamentary elections are expected later this year.

Embattled New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie delivered his State of the State address on Tuesday. The address came at an awkward time for Christie, who faces a widening investigation into politically-motivated lane closures at the George Washington Bridge. Christie acknowledged the scandal but tried to steer the conversation toward education and other second-term priorities.

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