Listen to NPR Stories Online

Oil companies hope to build the nation's largest oil-by-rail terminal on the Columbia River in Washington. Proponents say it will bring economic growth, but others fear it could mean fiery accidents.

The district has made progress, but many students are stuck with broken strings, squeaky horns and out-of-tune pianos.

If the Supreme Court strikes down subsidies, millions of people could no longer afford health insurance. And premiums for others would rise dramatically, as healthier people leave the marketplace.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says some wealthy foreigners seek to give birth to their children in the U.S. so they will obtain U.S. citizenship.

Over the past decade, states have slashed workers' compensation benefits, denying injured workers help when they need it most and shifting the costs of workplace accidents to taxpayers.

Some unauthorized immigrants who are parents of U.S. citizens and green-card holders are worried they may be forced to leave the U.S. because a court ruling has put a hold on their deportation relief.

Lots of politicians are calling for a shorter FAFSA — the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. It now has more than 100 questions. But, it turns out, shortening the FAFSA is a tall order.

An estimated 40 percent of France's 7 million Muslims live in and around Paris, many of them in the poor suburbs. It's hard to escape the banlieues, even for those who work or attend school elsewhere.

A Pennsylvania lawmaker wants to fine people who don't clean snow off their cars before getting on the road. Other states have similar laws. But for trucks, clearing the snow poses its own hazard.

Just 10 questions about bad childhood experiences can turn up undiagnosed illness in adults, research suggests. So why don't more doctors ask? Some say they aren't equipped to deal with the answers.




WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions


(256) 895-9574

(800) 239-9574