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Cattle rustling is a growing problem in Oklahoma, Texas and other beef-producing states. High beef prices and drug addiction are fueling the resurgence.

Ten years ago, 25,000 people huddled inside the Morial Convention Center in New Orleans seeking shelter from Hurricane Katrina. The fiasco there came to epitomize the chaotic, inadequate response.

Selling after a market plunge, financial experts say, just locks in the loss and prevents investors from participating in the rebound. But human psychology can make that advice excruciating to follow.

Native American tribes can be hampered trying to fight crime on reservations because they don't have access to federal databases. The Justice Department wants to help.

Under a centuries-old law, a small group of families has rights over swaths of land — including some of the country's most valuable areas — collecting taxes and taking a cut of property sales.

With the collapse of a 2-year ceasefire, Turkish forces and Kurdish militants are again killing each other in earnest. In one largely Kurdish town, residents are hunkering down for more bloodshed.

Unlike 2008, the current turmoil didn't originate in the U.S., economist Austan Goolsbee notes. And this time, the economy is growing, banks aren't in danger and there's no credit crunch, he says.

Laura Martinez defied many skeptics when she opened up her Chicago restaurant, La Diosa, this year. It helps that she used to work for the late Charlie Trotter, one of the city's most acclaimed chefs.

When you answer your phone and there's no one on the other end, it could in fact be a computer that's gathering information about you and your bank account. Here's how.

Efforts to reform the practice of isolating inmates faces opposition from many corrections officers, who say solitary confinement has been a trusted tool in American prisons for half a century.

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