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Tucked between Gray Thursday, Black Friday and Cyber Monday is Small Business Saturday. It's a designation invented by American Express, but it's becoming vital to small businesses around the country.

Healthcare.gov is supposed to be mostly fixed by Saturday, but errors in an obscure but crucial form could further disrupt the rollout.

Science isn't known as a career field that attracts showboats. But academics must give seminars, pharmaceutical researchers present results, and graduate students defend their work. In San Diego, one of the country's science hubs, a group aims to teach scientists the art of small talk and public speaking.

Afghanistan is a poor country with very expensive weddings. There is no alcohol, the sexes are completely segregated and the families may negotiate over the dowry right up to the last minute.

Renewable energy has become a $220 billion a year industry. But to significantly slow climate change, the power of wind, solar and other renewable sources must vastly expand. Some say the tech breakthroughs needed are on the horizon, though a top economist sees a tougher road ahead.

Cider is still a small part of the overall alcohol market, but it's growing faster than any other category — and not just the hot mulled stuff that steams up your kitchen. This cider is more like sparkling wine. Some of it is made with the same apple varieties, and in the same style, as the cider bottled by Thomas Jefferson.

NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg and surgeon David Reines ran into each other not long after their spouses had passed away. Soon — despite a couple of unforeseen events — the pair realized it was kismet that they had found each other.

Manufacturers in Oregon want to hire high school students. But they don't want the kinds of high school students that colleges are after — the kind who have amazing test scores and will spend hours perfecting essays. They want teenagers who want to paint, weld and work with their hands. The hope is that those teens will turn into enthusiastic workers in an industry where the current workforce is headed toward retirement.

Forecasters expected the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season to be really busy — the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration told Americans to expect between seven and 11 hurricanes. But this year has been one of the quietest on record. Why were the predictions so far off?

A Mormon Bishop in Taylorsville, Utah, went to great lengths last Sunday to teach his congregation a lesson. David Musselman disguised himself as a homeless person and walked around outside before the service. Then, in character, he walked up to the pulpit and asked to deliver remarks. He tells Ari Shapiro what happened next.

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