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In Haiti, abortion is illegal and women are turning to dangerous ways to end unwanted pregnancies. Host Michel Martin talks with Jacqueline Charles, of the Miami Herald, about the issue.

Two years after a federal judge ruled that New York City's fire department's tests discriminated against blacks and Hispanics, nearly 62 percent of graduates from the most recent class of the FDNY's training academy are minorities.

Federal regulators are cracking down on banks that are offering services called deposit advances. Many argue that the service is the same as payday loans and could lead consumers into a cycle of debt.

China's leaders hope to be able to fight and win two regional conflicts by 2020, according to the Pentagon in a report that highlights the East China Sea, site of recent tensions with the U.S. and Japan. The showdown over air space is the latest example of what the Pentagon sees as a resurgent Chinese military.

Probably the best feature of the retooled HealthCare.gov website is that you can actually use it. People are now able to get a customized list of plans and prices, and click through to see an insurer's provider directory. Still, better though it is, it's clearly not 100 percent.

The notoriously short night's sleep that many tired adolescents get isn't all about surging hormones and too much homework, according to a sociologist who looked at shifting sleep patterns from ages 12 to 15. Teens who report good relationships with family and schoolmates tend to sleep better.

Having trouble wrapping your head around southern Europe's staggering unemployment problem? This week, IKEA advertised for 400 jobs in a new megastore on Spain's Mediterranean coast. It got more than 20,000 online applicants in 48 hours, before the retailer's computer servers crashed.

The calls were made as gunman Adam Lanza entered the school on Dec. 14, killing 20 children and six staff members. "It's still going on," a school custodian told a dispatcher. "I keep hearing shooting. I keep hearing pops."

The Sunday pregame shows feature interchangeable ex-players and ex-coaches saying the same banal things, one after another. But on female-centered shows, observes Frank Deford, the hosts actually argue, hash things out, laugh and generally behave like flesh-and-blood human beings.

In 2000, Auliya Atrafi paid thousands of dollars and risked his life to escape Taliban-controlled Afghanistan. He spent 12 years in England, but recently returned to his homeland, where he is trying to readjust to — and change — life in a conservative society.

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