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The Philippine disaster is an example why it increasingly makes sense to buy food close to where its needed rather than ship it across the globe. Most U.S. food aid, though, travels to hotspots from U.S. ports. Critics say that wastes time and money.

France is deep in debate, wondering if there's a resurgence of an old, colonial racism, or if people have just become more tolerant of bigots.The questions stem from a series of race-based taunts against Justice Minister Christiane Taubira, who is black.

For many young readers, Dahl is a beloved author. But to Lucy Dahl, he's also Dad. "Matilda was one of the most difficult books for him to write," she says. "I think that there was a deep genuine fear within his heart that books were going to go away and he wanted to write about it."

Combine the records of baseball legends Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron and Pete Rose, and that approximates what India's most revered sportsman, Sachin Tendulkar, achieved on the cricket field during his fabled 24-year career. The ascent of the sport's superstar coincided with the rise of the new India.

Day after day, workers at Michigan State University care for and feed colonies of evolving bacteria. The original microbes have produced more than 50,000 generations in the 25 years since the experiment began. Despite predictions the bacteria might someday reach a point where they would evolve no more, the results show they keep changing.

The Obama Administration says slightly more than 106,000 people signed up for health care through new exchanges between October 1 and November 1. Host Michel Martin speaks with Kaiser Health News' Mary Agnes Cary about why the number is so low, and what the president says he's doing about it.

Croaky voice, a singing bowl, a sewing machine and guitar strings — life sounds in San Francisco.

The White House unveiled a fix for consumers who've had health insurance plans canceled. Critics have pointed out that the president promised Americans could keep their plans if they wished, but that things turned out differently. As for the health care program's problems, Obama said "we fumbled."

In the shattered city of Tacloban, officials say most of the aid that has arrived hasn't yet gotten to the people who need it. There aren't yet enough trucks, there isn't enough gas and there aren't enough rescue personnel to distribute food, water and other necessities.

Opium poppy cultivation has hit a record level, according to a new U.N. report. Western countries have been trying to eradicate the poppies for years. Yet it remains the single largest economic sector in places like the southern province of Helmand.

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