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Hiding the redesigned, 50th anniversary Ford Mustang before its official unveiling was no easy task — the photo-hungry car paparazzi were eager for a glimpse. But, like other car companies, Ford has its own "camouflage coordinator" to create a disguise for the vehicle during test drives and trial runs.

Photographer Bill O'Leary's big break came in 1990, the night Washington, D.C., Mayor Marion Barry was arrested during an FBI sting. O'Leary was an intern for The Washington Post, and he suddenly found himself in the right place and the right time to take the perfect shot of the mayor.

New York's program would be the most restrictive in the country and would be limited to 20 hospitals. Critics wonder how Gov. Andrew Cuomo plans to get the marijuana and why hospitals — which must abide by federal law — would want to participate.

For the third consecutive year, one section of the U.S.-Mexico border had a higher rate of illegal crossing than any other — the Rio Grande Valley. It's the closest crossing for Central Americans fleeing violence at home, but for them, the U.S. crossing is just the last, deadly portion of the trip.

Diamonds are supposed to be a girl's best friend. Now, they might also be her mother, father or grandmother. Turning your loved one's ashes into a diamond is one way to keep them close forever.

The administrative branch of the National Football League is tax-exempt, and many wealthy team owners can get generous subsidies from local governments for stadiums. Critics argue the public money could be better spent elsewhere. But can you put a price on the love of the game?

Federal forces are backing away from a plan to disarm the civilian militias that are defending their communities from ruthless drug traffickers. In the western state of Michoacan, it's unclear how long the fragile peace will last.

Eastern Kentucky is a place known as the poster child of the War on Poverty. When NPR's Pam Fessler traveled there to report, she was warned that people would be reluctant to talk because they were tired of being depicted as poor. Instead, she got an earful.

Under a deal mediated by a federal bankruptcy judge, a group of local and national foundations this week pledged more than $330 million to help Detroit's pension fund and protect the city's valuable art collection. Bio-chemical entrepreneur Paul Schaap is one of the donors; he speaks with NPR's Lynn Neary about the effort.

A new report says instant messaging is surpassing old-fashioned texting in Britain. It may seem too soon to talk about the good old days of texting, but technological turnover is another sign of the times. Also on the decline: phone numbers.

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