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In September, voters in Scotland will decide whether to end the union with England and return to independence. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Scottish Parliamentarian Fiona Hyslop about the vote.

Sherpas have a great reputation as the world's best climbers. But when something goes wrong up in the mountains, it deeply affects the small ethnic group and its communities around the world.

Moscow is demanding that Kiev's new constitution give so much autonomy to its diverse regions — particularly the Russian-speaking ones — that they could even conduct their own foreign policy.

The remains of William T. Carneal were found on the coastline of Saipan last year. After 70 years, Pfc. Carneal was remembered in a ceremony in his hometown of Paducah, Ky.

The FDA's decision to approve a new painkiller has met with fierce opposition. Judy Foreman, author of A Nation in Pain, tells NPR's Scott Simon why pain relief is such a highly polarized subject.

Syrian composer Malek Jandali's parents were beaten after he criticized the Assad regime in a performance abroad. Now Jandali is asking American and European audiences to donate to Syrians in need.

Thousands have been jailed in Egypt since a crackdown on dissent last November. But most Egyptians are unwilling to risk jail for reform; most wish things would finally quiet down.

President Obama wrapped up a two-day visit to South Korea, warning Pyongyang that pursuing nuclear weapons will only lead to more isolation. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn talks with NPR's Scott Simon.

It's early in the 2014 election season, but already some noteworthy — and powerful — biographical spots are starting to appear.

The official cheap liquor of spring breakers is becoming something much more sophisticated. And South Florida has become ground zero for the rum revolution.

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