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Scientists are asking people to contribute samples of their gut microbes to help figure out how those microbes affect human health. But ethicists say sharing that information, as well as the personal health data that makes it useful to researchers, poses risks. That's especially true for children.

The pipeline that brings water out of California's Owens Valley to metropolitan Los Angeles turns 100 this month. The water wars it has spawned over the century still simmer, and the issues of water use, scarcity and stewardship are inextricable — if often invisible — to life in the city.

South Asian communities around the world are celebrating good over evil, knowledge over ignorance, light over darkness. Sunday is Diwali, the Hindu Festival of Lights. The holiday isn't well-known in the U.S., though, so families rely on themselves to keep the tradition alive.

Booker brought the city lots of attention and investment to the New Jersey city as mayor. But now that he's a U.S. senator, will the trend continue? Booker helped change Newark's perception, but the city still faces persistent crime. Mayoral candidates are taking that issue — and their ideas for solving it — to voters.

The legal battle over the New York City Police Department's controversial policy took a dramatic turn last week. A federal judge had ruled the practice unconstitutional, but an appeals court put that order on hold. What will happen next will partly depend on who New York's next mayor is.

Mohammed Morsi, a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, was Egypt's first-ever democratically elected president. A year after he was elected, he was ousted by the military following massive protests against him. Morsi goes on trial Monday, accused of inciting violence against protesters.

Depending on where you live, you might be able to vote for your local coroner this election season. About 1,600 counties across the U.S. still elect coroners, and that means candidates have to be popular before they can start signing death certificates.

As a way to bring new people to the chuch, a few mainline churches are experimenting with informal services centered around craft beer. The result is not sloshed congregants; rather, it's an attempt to do church differently.

Latinos are three times as likely to be uninsured than white Minnesota residents, making them a key demographic for the state's new online health insurance marketplace. Health workers hope to encourage questions and provide answers by heading out onto the streets — and even into hair salons.

The rate of heroin use is up, and federal data shows that nearly 80 percent of people using the illegal drug had previously abused prescription painkillers. One doctor says addiction to painkillers must be treated — and prescriptions regulated — in part to stymie the draw to heroin.

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