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In 2011, Gov. Scott Walker signed a bill stripping collective bargaining rights from most public employees, sparking massive protests at the state Capitol. While most demonstrators eventually went away, a small group did not.

Long before smart watches became the latest pursuit for tech companies, Gordon Moore of Intel was experimenting with wristwatch computers. Intel's co-founder and his colleagues built a line of chip-powered watches in the late '70s. The concept was visionary, but the business was a failure. Moore now keeps a memento that he calls his "$15 million watch."

It's been five years since Lehman Brothers collapsed and touched off a banking crisis that is still being felt by the global economy. Today, the banking industry is a lot stronger than it was, but some critics say efforts to reform banking regulations have fallen short of their potential.

Cut a tumor from a child's brain and you may save a life. But surgery can hurt the child if healthy brain cells are removed. A Seattle doctor is working on a substance that might help. It binds tightly to cancer cells and makes them glow, so they're easier to distinguish from healthy tissue.

Suicide rates among Native Americans are already four times the national average. And with recent cuts in federal funding for mental health services across the country, suicide prevention programs may lose ground in the communities that need them most.

Celebrity editor Tina Brown announced Wednesday that she's leaving the news and opinion website to launch her own media company. She has been a regular guest on Morning Edition. Brown plans to produce live forums on news topics.

With the pause button pushed on the congressional debate over Syria, the House is turning its attention back to the budget. The House was supposed to act this week to avoid a government shutdown at the end of the month, and Republican leaders had hoped to avoid drama. But drama is brewing.

Security experts say the U.S. has a dearth of professionals qualified to take on cyberthreats like attacks on power grids or defense systems. In Alabama, a school district and the U.S. Army Cyber Command have teamed up to help prepare a new generation for cyber warfare careers.

How are Americans reacting to the crisis in Syria, and President Obama's speech Tuesday night? Host Michel Martin speaks with three editors - in Denver, Dallas and New York - to talk about the regional reactions to the situation.

President Obama asked Congress to delay a vote on military action in Syria, while the administration considers diplomatic options. Host Michel Martin speaks with Republican Senator Rand Paul about why he opposes a strike, and what he thinks should be done about Syria.

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