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Brazil is the world's third largest market for Facebook, the fifth largest for Twitter, and it has quickly become the largest market for Lulu, the controversial man-rating app for women. That has highlighted the country's race to pass legislation to keep up with a quickly changing society.

Psychologists have found a simple way to improve academic performance and even health. When people sit down and write about a negative experience and they revise their story to see it in a more positive way, it changes their behavior and helps them succeed.

As of Wednesday, licensed stores in Colorado can sell recreational marijuana, making it the first state to control and regulate a legal recreational marijuana industry.

The Supreme Court justice issued a decision Tuesday night that's putting part of President Obama's health insurance law in doubt. Groups like the Little Sisters of the Poor Home for the Aged are suing to block the law, saying it violates their religious freedom.

When physicist Flavio Noca first saw penguins zooming around underwater, he was blown away by their speed and maneuverability. Now, his team has built a robotic arm that perfectly mimics the flippers in action — and he says the device could someday propel underwater craft.

A local Christian aid group is trying to help villages adapt by planting drought-tolerant crops and setting up pumps for irrigation. But even with new methods and crops, farmers still need to know: When is it safe to plant?

Congress has tried to boost premiums on the cheap, subsidized insurance FEMA offers. But property owners in flood zones protested the rate hikes, and legislators backed off in 2013, calling for "further study." Meanwhile, a string of bad storms has left the program $24 billion in debt — so far.

An ATM that lets you video chat with a teller hundreds of miles away? It's part of an effort by the banking industry to cut costs: The more ATMs can do, the less banks have to spend on tellers and real estate. But in-person branches still remain the best way for banks to get new business.

Japan's tough new law protecting state secrets was a victory for Washington, which had long pressured its Asian ally to exert tighter control over classified information. But the controversial law has triggered widespread outrage in Japan and undermined the popularity of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Across the country, there's a wave of interest in local food, and a new generation of young farmers wants to grow it. But many aren't buying land. Instead, they're renting it.

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