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Criminal lawyers increasingly turn to brain science to explain their clients' actions. It's a tactic that's kept defendants out of jail. But neuroscientists say scans can be easily misused or misinterpreted. Now judges must decide whether the evolving science is being used in a sensible way.

As horrific as Haiyan has been, the disaster likely won't reach the same level of death and injury as the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 or Haiti's 2010 quake, disaster specialists say. Better communication systems in the disaster area are one reason why.

Medical tourism was expected to be huge in 2013, and countries like Colombia, which has seen huge improvements in safety and tourism, decided they wanted in on the action. In recent years they've been building facilities specifically designed for medical tourists. But the numbers have not quite met projections.

More than 600,000 have been left homeless and hungry by the devastating storm. In response, humanitarian agencies are mounting the largest relief operation since the Haitian earthquake in 2010. The biggest challenge right now is getting the basics — clean water and food — to the hardest hit areas.

Scientists say Typhoon Haiyan is one of the strongest ever recorded, though limited measurements may prevent them from declaring it as the record holder. Still, the storm was devastating: "We had a triple whammy of surge, very high winds and strong rainfall," says one climate scientist.

Perhaps no company showed how the Internet could turn sharing into a global phenomenon more than Napster. The music-sharing site upended the record industry. But the industry ultimately survived and free music Napster did not. What are new businesses doing to avoid the same fate?

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is bringing up bills that are putting Republicans on the spot — like a measure to ban workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. It's pre-election-year positioning — and Republicans are trying to do the same.

Distraught over the devastation wreaked on his nation by Typhoon Haiyan, the Philippines' representative at a global climate change conference said he will fast during the 11-day forum. Yeb Sano links weather catastrophes of recent years to global warming.

Author Colin Woodard says it's better to think of the U.S. as 11 distinct nations, instead of 50 states. He tells guest host Celeste Headlee how those nations came about, and why they play a role in everything from gun control to tax policy.

The home ownership rate in the U.S. is at its lowest since 1995. That's despite what was thought to be a rip-roaring recovery in real estate, and a long stretch of record low mortgages. Guest host Celeste Headlee learns more from Bloomberg Business Week contributor Roben Farzad.

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