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With the oil and gas sectors booming, the need for truckers is growing. But the ranks of well-trained drivers are shrinking, especially as baby boomers hit retirement age. And competition for drivers has become fierce, with the annual turnover rate nearing 100 percent.

The CIA's overthrow of Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh was a first for the agency and served as the template for covert operations across the globe.

A new Christian movement is growing in the American South and Southwest. "Cowboy church" pastors say their simple services, Western decor and adjacent rodeo arenas are bringing in worshipers who thought they didn't like church.

In the largely Hispanic Salinas Valley, high school students are more likely to imagine a future in agriculture than high-tech. A new program is trying to change that by helping young people who would have been working in the fields earn a bachelor's degree in three years.

Measles was declared eliminated in the U.S. more than a decade ago, but the disease has cropped up again in communities with low vaccination rates. In North Texas last month, 21 people came down with the disease, which began at a vaccine-skeptical megachurch.

After nearly 30 years, an official program that brought thousands of Jews from Ethiopia to Israel has come to an end.

Carlos'n Charlie's, a restaurant on Austin's Lake Travis that has long been a place for boaters and bathers to hang out in the summer, is closing its doors after Labor Day because the lake has receded. Guest host Wade Goodwyn speaks with Pete Clark, part-owner of the restaurant.

Many members of Congress had been clamoring for President Obama to come to Capitol Hill for permission before striking Syria, but some Republicans say he should have acted without waiting for approval. Guest host Wade Goodwyn talks with NPR's Ailsa Chang on how Congress may vote.

The president said has made up his mind that military action is required in Syria. And in a major surprise, he says he will seek permission from Congress to do it. Officials say that decision took him less than 24 hours to make.

Compared to the rest of the world, American schools don't stack up like they used to. But what's the best way to educate children? Author Amanda Ripley followed students and teachers across the globe to find out for her new book, The Smartest Kids in the World: And How They Got That Way.

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