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More older Americans are going online, but many seniors don't have the resources, devices or skills to navigate the Web. One pilot program is giving tablets and training to seniors to help them combat isolation while staying safe online.

Australia's Janean and David Richards used more than 31 miles' worth of LED lights to decorate their home. Their yard features a canopy of lights fanning out beneath a large tree whose trunk is wrapped in glowing colors.

Michel Martin talks with NPR education correspondents Claudio Sanchez and Eric Westervelt, about a new NPR series looking at problems within Philadelphia's public school system, and the lessons the rest of the country can take from Philly.

Education experts have been sounding the alarm for more students to go into STEM fields: science, technology, engineering and math. But some researchers suggest the STEM crisis is just a myth. Anthony Carnevale of The Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, tells host Michel Martin which side is right.

Across the developing world, 1 in 3 girls marries before age 18. Some are wed and become mothers by the time they reach their teens. In Malawi, some villages have started to punish parents who marry off their young daughters.

A bustling market has sprung up across several blocks of downtown Tacloban two weeks after Typhoon Haiyan destroyed much of the city. Vendors sell ice-cold sodas, as well as goods looted in the frenzy that followed the storm. Some are even offering haircuts, making more now than before Haiyan struck.

American studios are working hard to play well in China's gigantic — and growing — movie market, all while negotiating complex rules and competing with popular domestic films.

Everybody knows that you're not supposed to smoke while you're pregnant because it's bad for the baby. But nicotine patches often used to help women quit may pose a risk too, researchers say. Other forms of nicotine replacement may do less harm.

Iran's economy is in terrible shape. Inflation is rampant, Iran's currency — the rial — has plunged in value and oil exports have fallen dramatically. There's wide agreement that sanctions have squeezed Iran financially and increased pressure on its leaders to negotiate over the country's nuclear program.

This week on the podcast edition of All Things Considered, host Arun Rath goes inside the double lives of "fake" ATF hitmen, explores the new — and reformed — Sin City, and traces the money paid by banks for their roles in the financial crisis.

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