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John Lewis is a congressman from Georgia, a pillar of the civil rights movement and an author. Add to that resume something slightly less expected — comic book writer. Lewis is getting ready to release March, the new graphic novel of his life.

Starting Monday morning, you may notice something a little different about NPR's flagship news magazines. Morning Edition producer Jim Wildman writes about a little change that means a lot to him.

Radio and print ads launched this week warn of damage wrought by so-called patent trolls. Business groups and software developers say patents are being used as legal weapons in a tactic that costs the economy tens of billions of dollars a year.

As the world waits for what are expected to be U.S. missile strikes on military targets inside Syria in coming days, Secretary of State John Kerry made the Obama administration's case for holding the Syrian leader accountable.

The National Football League has agreed to pay hundreds of millions of dollars in a settlement over concussion-related injuries. But the league also denies any wrongdoing. So is it a victory for the players? The Barbershop guys weigh in.

Host Michel Martin and editor Ammad Omar crack open the listener inbox for backtalk. This week, listeners tweet about online activism, and education.

Russell Moore is considered the public face of Evangelical Christians, as the new leader of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission. Moore speaks with host Michel Martin about what it will take to bridge the racial gap in the Church and deal with some hot-button topics like immigration and abortion.

As the debate for military intervention continues, the UN's refugee agency has warned that Syria could be on the 'verge of the abyss.' Host Michel Martin learns more about the millions of people who have been displaced from Dr. Zaher Sahloul, president of the Syrian American Medical Society, and Rima Kamal, the Red Cross' spokesperson in Damascus.

For the victims and witnesses who came from Afghanistan to testify, the U.S. and its justice system were very strange. But seeing Staff Sgt. Robert Bales be sentenced to life in prison for killing 16 civilians brought them some peace. So too does their belief that he will suffer in the afterlife.

The White House is expected to soon release more of the evidence it says it has to support the case that the Assad regime used chemical weapons against its own people. Despite the news that Britain won't be joining in any military action, the Obama administration seems determined to go ahead.

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