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Sachin Tendulkar made his cricket debut as at the age of 16, and he's captivated fans ever since. This week, he announced his plans to retire. Indian politician Shashi Tharoor says batsman Tendulkar is "possibly one of the greatest in the history of the entire sport worldwide."

A quiet block on the city's northwest side appeared to be taken over by villagers from the mountains of southern Poland. As the festivities began, the bride's anxious father was desperate to make room for five wooden carriages, 12 horses and the band.

The craft-brewing industry has long been a male-dominated world. But that's starting to change. This weekend, several female-owned craft breweries are favored to take home the most prestigious awards at the Great American Beer Festival in Denver.

Doctors said Erik Schei would be a "vegetable" for the rest of his life — and he was only 21. He had been shot in the head on his second tour in Iraq. But his parents choose to bring him home and give him another chance at life. Now, they say he's smiling every day and grateful to be alive.

The extreme paralysis that has become the norm in Washington is almost never seen in Western European democracies. Political scientists say there are lessons the U.S. can take from Europe.

Some Michigan seniors may be going hungry thanks to the government shutdown. In western Kent County alone, more than 1,300 low-income seniors depend on a government surplus food program. But the USDA has announced that the program is hold until further notice.

Republican Ken Cuccinelli had been trailing Democrat Terry McAuliffe by a few points in the polls before the partial government shutdown. But since then, McAuliffe's lead has clearly widened in a state that's home to many federal employees.

The play Fetch Clay, Make Man explores the sense of identity through the eyes of two significant figures in black history — Stepin Fetchit (Lincoln Perry) and Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali).

There's a cult following for the game that most of America threw out when video games came along. It's more competitive than ever. And in the eyes of some, it's art.

Millions of American school children begin the day with the pledge of allegiance. But do they, or their teachers, really understand what it means? Host Michel Martin discusses the issue with journalist Mary Plummer, of KPCC, and Peter Levine, director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement.

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