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Later this year, the jazz legend will receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Sandoval talks with guest host Celeste Headlee about his start as a trumpet player in Cuba, his relationship with Dizzy Gillespie and how American citizenship influenced his music.

Schools have long used IQ tests to group students. But some experts say labels like 'gifted' or 'disabled' are following students throughout their education — for better and worse. Guest host Celeste Headlee finds out more.

Violence continues in Egypt, and the political situation there continues to get more volatile. Guest host Celeste Headlee checks in with NPR's correspondent, Peter Kenyon.

Fears are growing that the country may be headed toward civil war. The interim government and the military leaders who ousted President Mohammed Morsi have been cracking down on his supporters. Hundreds have died and thousands have been wounded. Twenty-five off-duty police officers were killed Monday.

Engineers at Carnegie Mellon University are developing the ultimate in automotive sophistication: the driverless car. When NPR's Brian Naylor went there to check it out, he thought he'd be going for a spin on a test track. No, the car drove itself through suburbia.

The Muslim Brotherhood has called for more protests. The government has said it will use live ammunition to protect public buildings and security forces. After Wednesday's crackdown left more than 600 people dead and nearly 4,000 wounded, the country is braced for even more bloodshed.

Bikers may have a tough image, but Happy Dodson, Taz Roman and other members of Bikers Against Child Abuse have a soft spot for kids. The international nonprofit accepts referrals from parents, police and social workers, and if those kids ever feel unsafe, BACA members will come roaring to their aid.

Werner Herzog's latest project is a slight departure for the acclaimed filmmaker: a 35-minute public service announcement on the dangers of texting and driving. Yes, it's long, he says, but the "inner landscape" of great suffering such accidents can cause "can only be shown if you have more time."

To understand how and why tornadoes form, some researchers are taking to the skies with small unmanned aircraft. The drones, outfitted with an array of sensors, can provide valuable data about the storms, and don't require people to be in harm's way. The goal is to increase the warning time before storms become deadly.

A bountiful blueberry crop this summer means lower prices. That's welcome news for consumers, but might spell trouble for blueberry farmers.

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