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Winston Churchill's backhanded compliment to Americans — that they'll always do the right thing, after trying everything else — is often repeated by members of Congress. There's no evidence that Churchill ever said it, but don't expect that to stop politicians from quoting it.

A year after the storm, some families in New York City's hardest-hit neighborhoods have managed to rebuild their homes and their lives. Some are waiting to find out more about new building codes and flood insurance rates. And others are ready to sell their flood-damaged properties and move on.

Current facial recognition technology is still not as powerful as it seems in the movies — not yet. Some big challenges stand in the way of what you might call "universal facial recognition." But those problems are being solved by all of us, every time we upload photos and label faces on social media.

The medical screening tests offered by churches and other nonprofits may sound like a great idea. They're convenient and affordable. But some of the tests are not recommended by national organizations because they can lead to more invasive testing and treatment that almost always isn't needed.

These days teenagers shun milk and reach for the energy drinks. That doesn't bode well for their bones, since most of the adult skeleton is built between ages 9 and 14. But milk isn't as fattening as teenagers think. They need vitamin D, too. But perhaps the most surprising ingredient for strong bones is exercise.

In this weekend's podcast of All Things Considered, host Arun Rath explores the power of Hollywood whisper campaigns, learns what some people are doing to prepare for "the big one," and talks to first time composer Alexander Ebert.

In Southern California and communities from St. Louis to Seattle, millions of Americans live in areas at risk for earthquake. But many have not taken simple steps to protect themselves — and seismologist can only provide limited warning.

An American rock musician born in Freeport on Long Island, N.Y., Lou Reed epitomized New York City's artistic underbelly in the 1970s, with his songs about hookers and junkies. Reed was 71.

In a charming tradition, hundreds gather regularly to sing folk songs in an underground station in the Ukrainian capital. It's an older crowd — some shuffle, some move at a stately pace, and some are as lively as the day they learned those steps.

The process of cataloging and destroying Syria's chemical weapons stockpile is continuing, as the country met Sunday's deadline for submitting a formal declaration. Weapons experts must also complete their inspection of all 23 storage and production sites today.

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