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In the shattered city of Tacloban, officials say most of the aid that has arrived hasn't yet gotten to the people who need it. There aren't yet enough trucks, there isn't enough gas and there aren't enough rescue personnel to distribute food, water and other necessities.

Opium poppy cultivation has hit a record level, according to a new U.N. report. Western countries have been trying to eradicate the poppies for years. Yet it remains the single largest economic sector in places like the southern province of Helmand.

The sharing economy is already changing several sectors: housing, transportation, retail. In some cities, it's changing the way we work. As more people start their own enterprises, they're shunning traditional offices and choosing to share space instead.

In the northern Rockies of Montana, wildlife is a part of daily conversation. Fishing alone generates $250 million a year, and the pursuit of trout brings in most of that money. But record droughts and declining snowpack mean streams are becoming less habitable for this revered fish.

Agents at the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives have spent months testing new plastic weapons, and report the guns can be lethal and hard to detect. The findings come just as a federal law that requires guns to be composed of at least some metal to help people in schools and airports detect them is set to expire.

As technical problems with the government's new health insurance marketplace slow the pace of sign-up, a variety of "fixes" have been proposed. But some of these would create their own challenges. In rough order from least to most disruptive, here are some of the ideas.

The Chinese town of Shijiao is known for recycling discarded Christmas tree lights for their copper and wire insulation, which are then used to support growing economies and make slipper soles, respectively. In Junkyard Planet, Adam Minter explores the business of recycling what developed nations throw away.

Wrecked infrastructure is making it hard for Filipino Americans to find out the status of family members affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jessica Petilla, a Filipino doctor in New York who has immediate family in the hard hit province of Leyte.

In Tacloban, a city of more than 220,000 people, some aid trucks are being looted as they arrive. Desperate for food, water and other essentials, many people are taking matters into their own hands.

It's the moment many victims of former Boston mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger have been waiting decades for. In federal court in Boston on Wednesday, relatives of those killed by Bulger will face the former gangster and describe their pain.

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