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Now that enrollment has opened for coverage under the Affordable Care Act, one of the biggest questions people have is, what's the deadline? It's Dec. 15 if you want coverage to start on Jan. 1. But open enrollment actually runs through March 2014. After that, you'll generally have to wait until next fall.

Iran's new President Hassan Rouhani says he will seek a nuclear agreement and an end to crippling Western economic sanctions. This has raised hopes that better economic times may be ahead. But Rouhani's team, as well as economists, say Iran's problems are deep-rooted and won't be easily solved.

President Uhuru Kenyatta and his deputy face charges at the International Criminal Court of instigating and financing deadly tribal violence after the disputed 2007 election. Their cases might never have reached this stage if not for one Kenyan judge and a remarkable disappearing act.

Wilma Stordahl is tall, blond and Norwegian. Two of her sons have a black father, but they both share their mother's Norwegian last name. Strangers have frequently told Stordahl that her sons are black, not mixed-race, but Stordahl and her boys say the term captures only part of who they are.

Glucosamine and chondroitin have been popular supplements for arthritis for years. But clinical trials in humans haven't shown that they're any better than sugar pills at reducing pain. Some doctors say that if placebos or supplements help people exercise and lose weight, then that's OK.

So far, tobacco companies have paid more than $100 billion to state governments as part of a 25-year, $246 billion settlement. Though the money was meant to be spent on prevention and smoking-related programs, it didn't come with a mandate.

Indian officials are reporting far fewer casualties than had been feared when the large and powerful cyclone Phailin struck the country's east coast Saturday. But the storm, which forced the evacuation of nearly 1 million people, has left flooding and destruction in its path.

Ishaq Amer's home was cut off from his Palestinian village when Israel erected a separation barrier around the West Bank. More important to the 13-year-old at the time was that he was cut off from his soccer buddies. An American boy saw a documentary about Ishaq's family and wanted to know what happened to them.

Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black has made no effort to hide his frustration with the political turmoil in his daily morning prayers.

The Food Network was intended for cooks, but it wasn't run by them. In a new tell-all book, Allen Salkin takes an unsparing look at the channel's progression from struggling cable startup to global powerhouse, and the people who rose and fell along the way.

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