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Orthodox Rabbi Joseph Telushkin says his belief in some form of life after death flows from the persistence of injustice on earth. If there were no afterlife, he says, "it would mean that Adolf Hitler and Anne Frank had the same fate."

Visual artist Carrie Mae Weems has been celebrated for her art and activism for decades, and now she can add a MacArthur 'Genius' Grant to her collection. In a 'Wisdom Watch' conversation with host Michel Martin, Weems discusses life, love and turning sixty.

Chicago Congressman Luis Gutierrez's life has been marked by arrests, no-holds-barred Chicago-style political fighting, and even the occasional Molotov cocktail thrown through his window. He speaks with host Michel Martin about his life and new memoir Still Dreaming: My Journey from the Barrio to Capitol Hill.

Latinos are some of the biggest consumers of social media in the U.S., but when it comes to developing the technology, the numbers aren't very high. Host Michel Martin speaks with Oscar G. Torres, who is hosting hackathons to encourage Latino innovation.

The physicists who discovered the so-called 'God Particle' were awarded the Nobel Prize this year, but one writer says people still aren't paying enough attention. Scientist Ainissa Ramirez tells host Michel Martin why more people should care about the Higgs Boson, and why they probably won't.

Whatever happens to a the global economy, one thing is clear: If the U.S. defaults, people all over the world who have loaned the government money won't get paid on time.

In 2008, Florida announced the largest land sale in the state's history — to buy hundreds of miles of Everglades land owned by U.S. Sugar. But only a small fraction was acquired. Now, environmental groups are lobbying for the deal's revival before a contract giving the state an exclusive option to buy expires.

When politicians say that small businesses are key to job growth, what most people imagine are mom-and-pop shops — the dry cleaner or coffee place. It may make a good sound bite, but research shows that most small businesses stay small. Only a fraction of these do grow into something big.

Journal editors would usually require researchers to disclose the genetic sequences needed to make a toxin that is the subject of a scientific paper. But the requirement was waived in the case of a new botulinum toxin because of the security risk.

Sapelo Island, off the coast of Georgia, has been home to generations of African-Americans since their ancestors were freed from slavery. Now, they might be losing their homes as growing property values send tax bills through the roof. Host Michel Martin speaks with Sapelo Island resident Cornelia Walker Bailey about the situation.

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