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Nearly 80 percent of all the U.S. currency in the world is in $100 bills. But some people want to get rid of the bill altogether.

As the Ebola outbreak rages in West Africa, it is also unfolding — in a virtual sense — inside the computers of scientists trying to predict how far the outbreak will spread and when it will end.

Some residents say that even before Ferguson police killed a teenager, they saw the police as a potential threat. Increasingly this week, they're seeing the police in military gear.

Police in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson used helicopters and armored vehicles to try to control an area torn by racial tension and outrage over the police shooting of an unarmed black teenager.

The reporter asks the nurse what the hospital needs. The nurse says, "If you don't help me, why do you ask me?" Welcome to Black Lion, said to be the country's best hospital.

Amid the emotional debate over the surge in unaccompanied minors from Central America, some migrants will be given refugee status while others can try for asylum.

Location, location, location too often trumps medical need, some doctors say. But another solution to making the distribution of scarce organs fairer worries some transplant surgeons and patients.

Projections suggest that climate change will hurt agriculture in most parts of the world. But some areas of the U.S. could actually see a benefit as corn production moves farther north.

You might have heard a lot recently about non-Asian people donning makeup or clothing to appear Asian. But why is it that we're seeing so much of this phenomenon, widely referred to as "yellowface"?

What does it take to be a man? In writer Matt de la Peña's family, it's meeting your woman in a traditionally macho way. Until now, he hasn't told them how he really met his wife eight years ago.

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