News from WLRH and NPR

News from WLRH

Huntsville's Christian Crocker has spent much of his musical life making choral recordings--all by himself!

News from NPR

To turn around the current jump in coronavirus cases, epidemiologist Ellie Murray says governments need to focus on the places that are driving the spread, like restaurants and bars.

The U.S. added more than 1 million cases in the past week. More than 85,000 people are hospitalized. Some states may have no choice but to lock down again. Others are trying a targeted approach.

Ernest Grant, the president of the American Nurses Association, says historical abuses have left Black people with a distrust of vaccines. Now he's part of a coronavirus vaccine trial.

The $1.95 billion Operation Warp Speed contract excludes government rights to inventions or production know-how developed in the manufacture of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Authorities do not know where the object came from or the intent behind it.

Dozens of immigrant women have said they received unwanted gynecological procedures at Irwin County Detention Center. Yet even as authorities investigate, the accusers have been in danger of removal.

ISIS fighters tore Kamo Zandinan's 4-year-old daughter Sonya from her arms in 2014. Zandinan, now a refugee in Canada, recently returned to Iraq to meet the 10-year-old girl she believes is Sonya.

The soaring value of Tesla stock has sent Musk's net worth skyrocketing, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. The automaker's CEO has added more than $100 billion to his net worth in 2020.

Harry Dunn's family argued the U.K. government had wrongly granted Anne Sacoolas diplomatic immunity. Sacoolas, the wife of a U.S. diplomat, is charged in his death but fled to the U.S.

President-elect Joe Biden inherits a global health landscape changed by the Trump administration more than under any Republican president since Ronald Reagan.

Dr. Peter Hotez is part of a team working to develop a low-cost COVID vaccine that could be distributed globally. "Vaccines are coming," he says. "We have to get everybody through to the other side."

Twitter said on Tuesday that after a three-year hiatus, it will again allow users to apply for the coveted blue check mark. The program was paused after a controversy over the badges in 2017.

Folks in other countries have figured out ways to hold a safe traditional celebration at a time of quarantines and lockdowns. Here are a few hacks they've devised.

As Joe Biden prepares to take office, he's talking to governors about trying to implement a national mask mandate. But to succeed, Biden is likely going to need to find a way to depoliticize masks.

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