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Leaders at Main Justice said they were "shocked" by the initial sentencing memo and directed the submission of another. Three prosecutors withdrew from the case. Trump said he isn't involved.

The bureau says it needs around a half-million temporary workers by this spring to carry out the national head count. Some census advocates are worried the agency isn't moving fast enough on hiring.

"What you have is a presidential campaign that is pushing lies and distortions and conspiracy theories into the bloodstream at an unprecedented rate," says Atlantic writer McKay Coppins.

Some Democratic presidential candidates want to ban fracking to help address climate change. That attracts young people, but may alienate swing voters in key oil and gas states like Pennsylvania.

About 95% of American public schools have adopted some form of active shooter drills. But there's little proof they're effective — and there's growing concern they can traumatize children.

The largest gift in Howard University's history — a $10 million investment in its STEM program — has sparked a larger conversation: which institutions get private donor money, and why.

Scientists say certain brain wave patterns can predict whether a person is likely to respond to a common antidepressant, or would do better with non-drug therapy.

When Pollan decided to write about caffeine, he gave it up — cold turkey. "I just couldn't focus," he says. "I was irritable. I lost confidence." Caffeine reshapes the brain in surprising ways.

Rising temperatures are speeding up erosion in some Alaska Native villages and making traveling on ice roads more dangerous, threatening the Census Bureau's plans for an accurate count.

The Killingly, Conn., school district changed a mascot from the Redmen to the Red Hawks last year at the recommendation of local Native Americans. This year, new board members reversed that decision.

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