Listen to NPR Stories Online

Priests of the powerful Georgian Orthodox Church led a recent attack on a group of people protesting against homophobia in Tbilisi, Georgia. The incident in May raises questions about human rights and the balance of power between church and state in the religiously conservative former Soviet republic.

Municipal leaders from across the country are trying to draw lessons from Detroit's bankruptcy. Host Michel Martin speaks with writers David Sirota and Mario Loyola about whether bad politics, or bad luck, got the motor city stuck in neutral.

Zimbabwe is gearing up for elections this week, and 89-year-old President Robert Mugabe is hoping to continue his grip on power. NPR's Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is in Harare for the vote. She joins host Michel Martin to talk more about what's at stake.

New statistics show the number of prisoners in the United States continues to fall. So what's behind the new trend, and is it here to stay? Host Michel Martin speaks with Vikrant Reddy from Right on Crime, and Nicole Porter from The Sentencing Project.

A year ago, Montana opened the nation's first clinic for free primary healthcare services to its state government employees. It was pitched as a way to improve employee health but faced political opposition. A year later, the state says the clinic is saving money and diagnosing a host of issues.

Picketers in seven cities say McDonald's, Wendy's and other fast-food chains should pay employees $15 an hour. But the restaurant industry says that would force those companies to cut jobs.

Chris Valasek and Charlie Miller have been hacking into products for a long time. But they don't steal stuff or mess with people; instead, their purpose is to pressure companies into making their products more secure. Their recent research on hacking cars has shown just how dangerous these kinds of attacks could be.

Scientists are squaring off yet again on the question of why some mammals are monogamous. A new paper claims monogamy is most likely the result of males trying to protect their youngsters from murderous rivals, but a second study says monogamy in mammals evolved in species where females were scattered about.

The industry estimates that the U.S. will need to add 2,000 miles of pipeline per year, and that's just natural gas. Oil will need its own infrastructure. That means there will be a lot of pipeline going through a lot of private land — along with sometimes long, drawn-out legal fights with landowners.

A sculpture memorializing the East Asian women forced to provide sex to Japanese soldiers during World War II is causing a stir in Glendale, Calif. An identical statue in Seoul has become a focal point of tension among former "comfort women" and some Japanese who say the women's stories are untrue.

Pages

©2019 WLRH PUBLIC RADIO

Address

WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions

Phone

LOCAL:
(256) 895-9574

TOLL-FREE:
(800) 239-9574